Mayo Clinic

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  • A New Approach to a Tough Cancer Diagnosis

    Sharing Mayo Clinic
    Hoyt Finnamore
    28 Jul 2014 | 1:19 pm
    At age 39, Tom Peroulas was active and fit. Coaching and playing rugby, biking to work in downtown Chicago, and exercising daily kept him in good shape. So when he started noticing pain in his leg, groin and hip, he thought it was probably related to activity. He tried stretching and yoga. He rested it. He worked with a physical therapist. Nothing helped. After several months of persistent pain, Tom turned to his doctor, who referred him to a specialist in orthopedics. By the time he turned 40, in April 2013, tests revealed the startling reason for his discomfort: an uncommon kind of cancer…
  • Dr. Younkin Receives Lifetime Achievement Award

    Advancing The Science
    Bob Nellis
    22 Jul 2014 | 11:10 am
    Presenting some new Alzheimer's discoveries wasn't the only high point for Mayo Clinic researchers in Copenhagen recently at the Alzheimer's Association International Conference. On July 14 Steven Younkin, M.D., Ph.D., was awarded the Khalid Iqbal Lifetime Achievement Award for his years of research on the disease. Dr. Younkin is Professor of Neuroscience at Mayo Clinic’s campus in Jacksonville, Florida. Before being recruited to Mayo in 1995, he was professor of Pharmacology and Pathology at Case Western Reserve University. Then he began research focused on the role of the amyloid…
  • Why You Need to be Challenged Daily

    Mayo Clinic Center for Innovation
    center_for_innovation
    28 Jul 2014 | 1:05 pm
        Great words that inspire us every day!
  • Mayo Clinic Radio: Shoulder Problems

    Mayo Clinic News Network » radio
    McCray
    23 Jul 2014 | 9:01 am
    Miss the show? Here is the podcast! Mayo Clinic Radio Full Show 7-26-2014 If you have shoulder problems the next Mayo Clinic Radio is for you!  On Saturday, July 26, at 9 a.m. CT, John Sperling, M.D., will join us to discuss the many causes of shoulder pain.  What do you know about shoulder bursitis, tendinitis and something called Wiiitis? How are torn rotator cuffs diagnosed and repaired? We'll discuss a new option for patients with arthritis called reverse arthroplasty.  Join us! Myth or Fact:  Rotator cuff tears can heal without surgery. Follow #MayoClinicRadio and tweet your…
  • Lessons from My First Year in Graduate School

    Diversity in Education Blog
    Crystal Mendoza
    10 Jul 2014 | 3:51 pm
    I would like to thank my fellow Diversity Blog editors for their helpful advice and input for this blog post. As summer begins, my first year of graduate school comes to an end. The fact that my first year of graduate school has come to a close brings mixed feelings. I have come a bit further than I was at this same time last year, and thankfully, have learned a few things. In honor of the incoming graduate school class, I have decided to dedicate this post to them to hopefully offer some helpful advice on first-year experiences. The most important aspect of a PhD is the mentor and lab in…
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    Sharing Mayo Clinic

  • A New Approach to a Tough Cancer Diagnosis

    Hoyt Finnamore
    28 Jul 2014 | 1:19 pm
    At age 39, Tom Peroulas was active and fit. Coaching and playing rugby, biking to work in downtown Chicago, and exercising daily kept him in good shape. So when he started noticing pain in his leg, groin and hip, he thought it was probably related to activity. He tried stretching and yoga. He rested it. He worked with a physical therapist. Nothing helped. After several months of persistent pain, Tom turned to his doctor, who referred him to a specialist in orthopedics. By the time he turned 40, in April 2013, tests revealed the startling reason for his discomfort: an uncommon kind of cancer…
  • Air Ambulance Ride Confirms Family’s Gratitude for Mayo Clinic

    Hoyt Finnamore
    16 Jul 2014 | 3:06 pm
    Growing up in South Dakota, Brandon Mauck had heard stories about the famous medical institution surrounded by cornfields in Rochester, Minnesota. Mayo Clinic's reputation inspired him to become part of the Mayo organization, and for the past four years, he has been working in the Department of Nursing at Mayo Clinic in Arizona. What he perhaps wasn't expecting is how strongly his beliefs about the organization would be confirmed through his personal experience and that of his young family. Recently, Brandon wrote to Mayo Clinic's president and CEO, John Noseworthy, M.D., to recount a…
  • Nicole’s Journey From Nurse to Transplant Patient and Back

    Hoyt Finnamore
    30 Jun 2014 | 7:05 pm
    When Nicole Jahns was just five months old, her parents – and her doctors – knew something was wrong. She wasn't gaining weight like a five-month-old should, and she wasn't, as her doctors put it, "thriving." They soon discovered why. Nicole had cystic fibrosis, an inherited disorder that affects the cells that produce mucus, sweat and digestive juices causing them to become thick and sticky rather than thin and slippery, as they should be. It's a life-threatening condition that can cause severe damage to a person's digestive system and lungs. Though it's been challenging at times, Nicole…
  • College Student Overcomes Anti-NMDA Receptor Encephalitis

    Susana Shephard
    26 Jun 2014 | 3:29 pm
    In her early 20s, Erin Ayub has big plans. As a college student in El Paso, Texas, she is also a musician and aspiring writer. She had to put her plans on hold for a bit while in a medically induced coma at Mayo Clinic in Arizona due to a rare illness — anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis. Now on the road to recovery, Erin and her mom share her story in this video.
  • Fiction Becomes Reality: Surviving Metastatic Appendiceal Cancer

    Susana Shephard
    25 Jun 2014 | 10:25 am
    "There's something weird going on," explained the surgeon in Las Vegas, Nevada. For retired hotel executive Charles Livingston, these words signaled the start of a long journey, which began following an emergency appendectomy. He had experienced abdominal symptoms and received various diagnoses before being rushed to the operating room for a burst appendix. Following surgery, Charles received devastating news -- he had metastatic appendiceal cancer. His local oncologist referred him to Mayo Clinic in Arizona where he met with Nabil Wasif, M.D., a surgeon, and John Camoriano, M.D., an…
 
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    Advancing The Science

  • Dr. Younkin Receives Lifetime Achievement Award

    Bob Nellis
    22 Jul 2014 | 11:10 am
    Presenting some new Alzheimer's discoveries wasn't the only high point for Mayo Clinic researchers in Copenhagen recently at the Alzheimer's Association International Conference. On July 14 Steven Younkin, M.D., Ph.D., was awarded the Khalid Iqbal Lifetime Achievement Award for his years of research on the disease. Dr. Younkin is Professor of Neuroscience at Mayo Clinic’s campus in Jacksonville, Florida. Before being recruited to Mayo in 1995, he was professor of Pharmacology and Pathology at Case Western Reserve University. Then he began research focused on the role of the amyloid…
  • Using Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis in Patient Care

    Bob Nellis
    10 Jul 2014 | 6:48 am
      M. Hassan Murad, M.D. A team of international experts led by a Mayo Clinic researcher has published in the Journal of the American Medical Association a guide for clinicians who are interested in using systematic reviews and meta-analysis in clinical decision making. This article is the latest in the well-known series of users’ guides to the medical literature that JAMA started publishing in the mid 1990s and is highly sought after by clinicians who want to learn and practice evidence based medicine. “When searching for evidence to answer a clinical question, it’s better to seek…
  • Mayo’s 22 in “Highly Cited Researchers”

    Bob Nellis
    30 Jun 2014 | 10:28 am
    One of the factors in determining the impact a researcher has in the world of science is the number of times that papers by that individual are cited in other peer-reviewed articles. The assumption is that if a discovery is significant, more researchers will use it as a basis for advancing their own research and therefore will be compelled to reference it. Highly Cited Researchers is a compilation of such top researchers -- published  by Thomson Reuters -- across the breadth of research, including physical and life sciences, mathematics and engineering. The count is divided up into groups…
  • Medical Genomics is an increasing part of the biosciences

    Bob Nellis
    24 Jun 2014 | 2:58 pm
    Dr. Eric Wieben, Mayo's Center for Individualized Medicine and Jenn Pettit, State of Minnesota, discuss clinomics at BIO 2014. It was only a decade ago that people were asking us how to pronounce "genomics."  I kid you not. Media had questioned the usefulness of the human genome without asking the right questions of the right organizations. Today the application of a the wide-ranging benefits of genomic knowledge is occupying increasing numbers of institutions around the world. Mayo Clinic has long been a pioneer in pharmacogenomics (choosing the right drug, at the right dose, for the right…
  • University of Minnesota and Rochester Headline BIO Gathering

    Bob Nellis
    24 Jun 2014 | 1:03 pm
    University of Minnesota Vice President for Research Brian Herman greets the crowd and is about to make Rochester Mayor Adell Brede an honorary U of Mn alum. International researchers, company executives and government leaders networked for three hours as part of the Minnesota reception, kicking off the weeklong BIO 2014 conference in San Diego this week. The close association among private and public entities in the state always seems to be of interest to people. Mayo Clinic, the University of Minnesota, the state's Department of Employment and Economic Development and Business Sweden were…
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    Mayo Clinic Center for Innovation

  • Why You Need to be Challenged Daily

    center_for_innovation
    28 Jul 2014 | 1:05 pm
        Great words that inspire us every day!
  • #TBT To The Forum at Transform

    AJ Montpetit
    24 Jul 2014 | 9:11 am
      Written By Contributing Guest Writer: Jessica Solberg When I walked into the 2013 Transform symposium at the Mayo Clinic Civic Center, I was not sure what to expect. As part of the media team, I was assigned to write about my experience at “Connecting at the Forum”, an area designated to see innovative work from different Transform community members. I become more knowledgeable on areas the community feels healthcare is lacking and discussed how we can improve these areas to better serve the patients. Circulating the room, with doctors, nurses, journalists, and other students I…
  • Entrepreneurship Growing in Mayo Clinic

    center_for_innovation
    22 Jul 2014 | 3:28 pm
      When you think about entrepreneurs and breakthrough inventions, you might imagine someone tinkering with a gadget (perhaps a doohickey or thingamajig) in a garage. You might not, however, picture a Mayo researcher tinkering with peptides to fight hypertension, creating a tracking system for viruses, or fashioning a tool to make medical information easier to read for those with poor vision. But our friends at Mayo Clinic Ventures would like us to, and a recent article series in the Minneapolis/St. Paul Business Journal gets under the hood to explore why. Mayo's efforts to encourage…
  • How To Find The Best Solution

    AJ Montpetit
    21 Jul 2014 | 8:08 am
        When dealing with design, innovation and design thinking, it's tempting to stay in the conversation mode while discussing our thoughts and ideas to problems. The faster we can build something tangible, the better. By creating that first prototype quickly, we can work through the issues that might not be recognizable until the idea is born into reality. Moving quickly through this phase helps generate solutions, recognize success, and move through failures. Our Transform community was built around the idea that we can all learn more, and refine our skills better working together.
  • How To Bring Innovation To Health Care

    AJ Montpetit
    17 Jul 2014 | 11:35 am
      Innovation in a clinical setting can be a challenge, working through the challenges of incremental innovation and big innovation. Our team here at the Center for Innovation met with the Yale School of Management on how the challenge of big revolutionary innovation is tempered with the challenge of incremental innovation, and the balance that they both play in creating a successful culture of innovation. Innovation of any size or shape is near impossible in a vacuum setting; it inherently requires collaboration in order to succeed. Our Transform symposium was put together in…
 
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    Mayo Clinic News Network » radio

  • Mayo Clinic Radio: Shoulder Problems

    McCray
    23 Jul 2014 | 9:01 am
    Miss the show? Here is the podcast! Mayo Clinic Radio Full Show 7-26-2014 If you have shoulder problems the next Mayo Clinic Radio is for you!  On Saturday, July 26, at 9 a.m. CT, John Sperling, M.D., will join us to discuss the many causes of shoulder pain.  What do you know about shoulder bursitis, tendinitis and something called Wiiitis? How are torn rotator cuffs diagnosed and repaired? We'll discuss a new option for patients with arthritis called reverse arthroplasty.  Join us! Myth or Fact:  Rotator cuff tears can heal without surgery. Follow #MayoClinicRadio and tweet your…
  • Protected: Downloads for week of 7-21-2014

    Audrey Caseltine
    19 Jul 2014 | 9:11 am
    This content is password protected. To view it please enter your password below: Password:
  • Mayo Clinic Radio: Oral Health

    McCray
    16 Jul 2014 | 1:18 pm
    Miss the show? Here's the podcast: Mayo Clinic Radio Full Show 7-21-14 The next Mayo Clinic Radio will make you smile!  On Saturday, July 19, at 9 a.m. CT, Thomas Salinas, D.D.S., will join us to discuss different aspects of oral health.  We’ll talk about new ways to restore teeth and replacing missing teeth. Also on the list for discussion — the dramatic increase in oral cancers in those afflicted with HPV, how oral health impacts overall health, the affect of certain medications on oral health and the importance of oral health for aging patients.  Join us!
  • Protected: Downloads for week of 7-14-2014

    Audrey Caseltine
    14 Jul 2014 | 12:49 pm
    This content is password protected. To view it please enter your password below: Password:
  • Mayo Clinic Radio: Measles Virus vs. Cancer

    McCray
    9 Jul 2014 | 2:39 pm
    Miss the show? Here is the podcast: Mayo Clinic Radio Full Show 7-12-2014  On Saturday, July 12, at 9 a.m. CT, we’ll talk about the groundbreaking research involving the measles virus to fight cancer. The process is called oncolytic virotherapy and Dr. Stephen Russell will be our guest, along with his patient Stacy Erholtz who received 10 million doses – a seemingly lethal amount – of the measles virus to treat her multiple myeloma. To donate to Stacy Erholtz's "Let's Go Viral" foundation, click here for the Brainerd Lakes Area Community Foundation. The Wall Street Journal article…
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    Diversity in Education Blog

  • Lessons from My First Year in Graduate School

    Crystal Mendoza
    10 Jul 2014 | 3:51 pm
    I would like to thank my fellow Diversity Blog editors for their helpful advice and input for this blog post. As summer begins, my first year of graduate school comes to an end. The fact that my first year of graduate school has come to a close brings mixed feelings. I have come a bit further than I was at this same time last year, and thankfully, have learned a few things. In honor of the incoming graduate school class, I have decided to dedicate this post to them to hopefully offer some helpful advice on first-year experiences. The most important aspect of a PhD is the mentor and lab in…
  • Why aren’t more white males a part of the Lean In discussion at Mayo Clinic?

    Andrew M. Harrsion
    29 Jun 2014 | 5:36 pm
    By Rielyn R. Campbell I think Jackson Katz said it best in his Ted talk from November 2012, “A lot of men hear the term “women’s issues” and we tend to tune it out, and we think, “Hey, I’m a guy. That’s for girls.” Or “That’s for the women.” And “a lot of men literally don’t get beyond the first sentence as a result.” I hope if you are a man reading this, you get past the first sentence. On June 19, 2014, I attended the Lean In session (link through Mayo Clinic intranet only), hosted by Mayo Clinic’s Office of Diversity and Inclusion and several Mayo Employee…
  • DREAMing a Career in Science (Undocumented Students’ Pursuit of Science Careers)

    Clara Castillejobecerra
    5 Jun 2014 | 1:42 pm
    On June 15, 2012, the Obama administration announced the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program, which provides deportation relief for a period of two years to qualified undocumented youth who came to the United States as children. While deferred action does not confer lawful status in the United States, it is a renewable program that can provide employment authorization to DACA recipients. Since its announcement, more than half a million youth have applied to deferred action becoming a successful first step into a more permanent immigration reform. Modified from Educators for…
  • This is your mind on grad school: The state of graduate student mental health at UC Berkeley

    Carl Gustafson
    29 May 2014 | 12:06 pm
    Editor’s note: This article was first published in the Spring 2014 edition of the Berkeley Science Review. It has been re-posted to the Mayo Clinic Diversity in Education blog with the direct, written consent of the original authors. You may view the original article here. Featured image: In a 2012 survey of UC Berkeley graduate students, nearly half of respondents reported frequently feeling overwhelmed, exhausted, sad, hopeless, or depressed. credit: concept: Holly Williams; design: tagxedo.com; source for words: csf/asuc/ga 2012 graduate student survey and uhs.berkeley.edu This is your…
  • Finding a science Profession, or What do I want to be when I grow up?

    Andrew M. Harrsion
    22 May 2014 | 7:57 pm
    By Stephen C. Ekker, PhD High angst for a PhD student in life sciences today. From the mea culpa ‘Rescuing US biomedical research from its systemic flaws’ in published in PNAS by Drs. Alberts, Kirschner, Tilghman, and Varmus, to the high uncertainty of public funding of science, it is understandable – and very appropriate – for young scientists to be concerned about their future. Dr. Ekker with Drs. Eleanor Chen and Ann Davidson, both former grad students in the Ekker lab and both pursuing their own science adventures (one in the US, one now in Canada). Although all of the current…
 
 
 
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