Mayo Clinic

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  • Kidney/Liver Recipient Dedicates His Time to Mentoring Children after Successful TV Sports Career

    Sharing Mayo Clinic
    Paul Scotti
    23 Apr 2014 | 9:03 am
    After 35 years on the road as a video technician for the CBS network covering major sporting events including the Super Bowl, the Olympics, SEC football, the Masters Golf Tournament, and the U.S. Open Tennis Tournament, Brooklyn native Robert Duffy was living a very active and busy life that kept him on the road about 240 days a year. At 60 years of age, his diabetes was under control, and he otherwise seemed healthy as he led a life of irregular hours, extended travel and living out of hotel rooms. All that changed in 2011, when he became ill while covering a golf tournament in San Diego.
  • The Road to Discovery Runs through Mayo’s Clinical Research Unit

    Advancing The Science
    Bob Nellis
    16 Apr 2014 | 1:30 pm
    The road to developments that change medicine is jammed with great ideas.  It meanders like a mountain trail in the early stages with many ideas failing and being discarded.  But once an innovative medical breakthrough reaches the point of clinic research, the road runs straight as a Midwest highway through a patient-study unit nestled in Mayo Clinic’s campus in Rochester, Minn. The Clinical Research Unit (CRU) is the unsung waypoint through which any number of landmark patient studies have traveled en route to improving the lives of millions of people, including revolutionary discoveries…
  • Innovation in the Definition of Health

    Mayo Clinic Center for Innovation
    center_for_innovation
    24 Apr 2014 | 10:29 am
        Article Written By Contributing UMR Author, Kate Scheffler As the average life expectancy continues to rise in the U.S., an increase in the onset of chronic diseases such as diabetes and heart disease has been identified. With this shift in illness, the current definition of health has been deemed inadequate. At the 2013 TRANSFORM symposium held at the Mayo Civic Center, Dr. Alex Jadad, a physician and public advocate, spoke of his mission of enabling individuals to live health and happy lives. In an effort to understand the true meaning of health, Dr. Jadad confronted the issue…
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    Mayo Clinic News Network » radio
    McCray
    22 Apr 2014 | 5:43 am
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  • A simple story in science

    Diversity in Education Blog
    Carl Gustafson
    24 Apr 2014 | 2:22 pm
    “Whatever America hopes to bring to pass in the world must first come to pass in the heart of America.” –Dwight Eisenhower I recently got my passport, and the above quote is inscribed on pages 7 and 8. I read it and immediately translated it to “Whatever the Ph.D. student hopes to bring to pass in the Ph.D. must first come to pass in the heart of the Ph.D student.” That interpretation may be stretching the bounds of my “artistic license”, but hey, it’s inspirational. The list of things I would like to bring to pass in my Ph.D. is fairly short; after “make a world-changing…
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    Sharing Mayo Clinic

  • Kidney/Liver Recipient Dedicates His Time to Mentoring Children after Successful TV Sports Career

    Paul Scotti
    23 Apr 2014 | 9:03 am
    After 35 years on the road as a video technician for the CBS network covering major sporting events including the Super Bowl, the Olympics, SEC football, the Masters Golf Tournament, and the U.S. Open Tennis Tournament, Brooklyn native Robert Duffy was living a very active and busy life that kept him on the road about 240 days a year. At 60 years of age, his diabetes was under control, and he otherwise seemed healthy as he led a life of irregular hours, extended travel and living out of hotel rooms. All that changed in 2011, when he became ill while covering a golf tournament in San Diego.
  • Twin Sisters Share Many Things in Life, Including New Lungs

    Paul Scotti
    3 Apr 2014 | 7:43 am
    Linda Foster (left) and Brenda Santinelli (right), twin sisters from Pensacola, Fla and patients of Mayo Clinic in Florida. It’s often said that twins share similar traits and have unique bonds that other siblings simply don’t have. Sometimes those traits are things one would rather not share with their twin, especially when it comes to a potentially life-threatening medical condition. Linda Foster and Brenda Santinelli, 60-year-old twin sisters from Pensacola, Fla., are active women with a love of the outdoors. Hiking, camping, fishing, hunting and other activities were well-suited to…
  • The Team Behind Team Lola

    mayoclinic
    2 Apr 2014 | 5:00 am
    Most 13-year-old girls wouldn't see having a scar down the middle of their chests as cool. Lola Montilla, however, is not your average 13-year-old girl. When she looks at the scar on her chest from the surgery she had at Mayo Clinic to repair the Ebstein’s anomaly heart defect she was born with, she says it serves as a reminder that what doesn't kill us does indeed make us stronger. "I really, really like my scar," Lola says, from her home in Puerto Rico. "Every time I look at it, it makes me think, 'Wow, I really did go through this, and I'm now back here at home.'" Her mom, Mari…
  • Patient Honors Her Liver Donor and Faith in New Book

    Paul Scotti
    26 Mar 2014 | 10:44 am
    Hildred "Peggy" Lyons' first signs of liver problems occurred back in 1968, around the time of her son's birth, when her physician noticed she had elevated liver enzymes. An otherwise healthy woman who worked and also volunteered as a fitness instructor at her church teaching several classes a day to both adults and children, Lyons dismissed it as pregnancy-related and didn’t gave it much thought for the next 30 years. Unfortunately, her liver problems resurfaced right around the time she retired from her job at Proctor and Gamble in 1998. Lyons was told by her physician in her hometown of…
  • A New Chapter: Life After My Liver and Kidney Transplant

    Paul Scotti
    18 Mar 2014 | 12:53 pm
    Written by Elaine Ginn, transplant patient at Mayo Clinic in Florida As I sit here at the Mayo Clinic lab on the Florida campus waiting to be called for a lab draw of a dozen or so tubes of my blood, my mind returns four years to the time before my liver and kidney transplant surgery. I can't say I had given up, as that just isn't in my nature, but I had become so ill that I could imagine myself slipping into oblivion and perhaps not minding. It was December, about five months before the transplant, and my two local grandchildren had come over to spend the night and help me decorate the…
 
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    Advancing The Science

  • The Road to Discovery Runs through Mayo’s Clinical Research Unit

    Bob Nellis
    16 Apr 2014 | 1:30 pm
    The road to developments that change medicine is jammed with great ideas.  It meanders like a mountain trail in the early stages with many ideas failing and being discarded.  But once an innovative medical breakthrough reaches the point of clinic research, the road runs straight as a Midwest highway through a patient-study unit nestled in Mayo Clinic’s campus in Rochester, Minn. The Clinical Research Unit (CRU) is the unsung waypoint through which any number of landmark patient studies have traveled en route to improving the lives of millions of people, including revolutionary discoveries…
  • Cancer Researchers Begin Blog Series on Cures for Kidney Cancer

    Bob Nellis
    7 Apr 2014 | 9:27 am
      Winston Tan, M.D. John Copland, III, Ph.D.   We’re Drs. Winston Tan and John “Al” Copland and we collaborate in pursuit of cures for kidney cancer.  Winston is a Mayo Clinic physician oncologist who treats kidney cancer patients and collaborates with Al, a Mayo scientist dedicated to kidney cancer research. In talking with kidney cancer survivors and friends, we have been encouraged to begin a blog about our research efforts and discoveries in kidney cancer. Current FDA approved drugs are not cures.  They provide some survival benefit (in a small number of cases, long…
  • Volunteers Sought: People with HPV-positive Tonsil and Tongue Cancers

    Nicole Brudos Ferrara
    3 Apr 2014 | 1:55 pm
    http://youtu.be/3UetqTM9P5I Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., is seeking volunteers for a clinical trial for patients with human papillomavirus (HPV) positive tonsil or tongue (oropharynx) cancer whose disease has not spread outside of the neck. The purpose of the study is to find out if reducing treatment time and dosage can control the cancer while decreasing short-term and long-term side effects associated with treatment. Who is eligible? You may be eligible to participate in this study if you: Have been diagnosed with HPV-positive tonsil or tongue (oropharynx) cancer. Are 18 years of age…
  • Gregory Gores, M.D., Receives 2014 AGA Distinguished Mentor Award

    Gina Chiri-Osmond
    27 Mar 2014 | 8:32 am
    Congratulations to Gregory Gores, M.D., who recently received the 2014 American Gastroenterological Association (AGA) Distinguished Mentor Award. Dr. Gores is the current Executive Dean for Research at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., responsible for the leadership and management of all Mayo research centers, divisions, programs, and other research activity. In assuming this role, Dr. Gores is recognized with the distinction of a named professorship: the Mr. and Mrs. Ronald F. Kinney Executive Dean for Research Honoring Ronald F. Kinney, Jr. The American Gastroenterological Association is the…
  • The Connection Between Teeth and Heart Surgery

    Bob Nellis
    28 Feb 2014 | 7:38 am
    We want to pass on some published Mayo Clinic research as reflected in the media this week. This one, from the Annals of Thoracic Surgery is especially interesting and useful to both physicians and patients alike. HealthDay Getting Teeth Pulled Before Heart Surgery May Pose Serious Risks by Randy Dotinga…In a small, retrospective study, Mayo Clinic researchers found that 8 percent of heart patients who did not wait to have teeth pulled suffered major adverse health outcomes, such as a heart attack, stroke, kidney failure or death. "Guidelines from the American College of Cardiology and…
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    Mayo Clinic Center for Innovation

  • Innovation in the Definition of Health

    center_for_innovation
    24 Apr 2014 | 10:29 am
        Article Written By Contributing UMR Author, Kate Scheffler As the average life expectancy continues to rise in the U.S., an increase in the onset of chronic diseases such as diabetes and heart disease has been identified. With this shift in illness, the current definition of health has been deemed inadequate. At the 2013 TRANSFORM symposium held at the Mayo Civic Center, Dr. Alex Jadad, a physician and public advocate, spoke of his mission of enabling individuals to live health and happy lives. In an effort to understand the true meaning of health, Dr. Jadad confronted the issue…
  • How to Embraces Failure in Innovation

    center_for_innovation
    22 Apr 2014 | 10:08 am
      Failure is something that we should never fear, and in fact, it is something we can learn from. Innovation means trying new things and processes, and not always being a success. Thomas Edison had at least 1,000 different ways to not create the light bulb, and it led to one of the greatest modern inventions. You can learn a lot from failure, and from other's failures too. Learn more at our Transform symposium this year! Upload your own story of how failure led you to a new lesson/direction/idea and tweet it out with #embracefailure!      
  • Keep Failing.

    center_for_innovation
    21 Apr 2014 | 8:08 am
    Great words to inspire us all for the week! Innovation is not a task that is always perfectly laid out in front of us, and we need to discover many ways certain things don't work, before we find how it works the best. Find out more about some of the people we've been inspired by who have pushed through their trials and failures, at this year's Transform symposium!
  • Lorna Ross Speaks about Designing for Consequence

    Linda Lee Cooper
    15 Apr 2014 | 10:10 am
                          Lorna Ross, Director of Design at Mayo Clinic Center for Innovation spoke at Fjord Kitchen Madrid "Glimpse into the Future of Health" in January of this year.  Ross opened up the doors of Mayo Clinic, one of the world’s most respected medical institutions, founded 150 years ago, and the first to incorporate a design team at the heart of its innovation activity.  
  • Love What You Do

    center_for_innovation
    14 Apr 2014 | 9:03 am
    We love what we do here at the Center for Innovation, and finding this quote from Seth Godin was perfect for this week! Show up, make a difference, and do work that matters. Three amazing key insights to get value out of what you endeavor to do each day. Let this inspire you this week, and share with us what you are doing to make a difference in your work! A quick thank you to New Old Stock for providing the image for this wallpaper!
 
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    Mayo Clinic News Network » radio

  • Protected: Downloads for week of 4-21-2014

    McCray
    22 Apr 2014 | 5:43 am
    This content is password protected. To view it please enter your password below: Password:
  • Mayo Clinic Radio: Cyberchondria

    McCray
    21 Apr 2014 | 2:09 pm
    Have you ever used the internet to research a medical symptom you might be experiencing?  On Saturday, April 26, at 9 a.m. CT, we'll discuss a condition called cyberchondria. Richard Seime, Ph.D., will be on the program to talk about the use of the internet for medical information. Of course we know the best internet site for accurate medical information is our own MayoClinic.org ... but there is so much information in cyberspace, when does it become a problem?  How many people are using the internet to self-diagnose or self-treat?  When is the internet helpful and when is it…
  • Mayo Clinic Radio: Good Samaritan Kidney Donor

    McCray
    16 Apr 2014 | 2:03 pm
    April is Donate Life Month, which focuses attention on the importance of registering as organ, eye and tissue donors. Tune in Saturday, April 19, at 9 a.m. CT as we discuss organ donation with Good Samaritan kidney donor Philip Fischer, M.D., and director of the Mayo Clinic kidney transplant program Mikel Prieto, M.D. There is so much to learn about donating the gift of life! Join us!  Myth or Matter of Fact:  I'm not in the best of health, so I probably can't be a donor. To hear the program LIVE on Saturday, click here. Miss the program?  Here's the…
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    Audrey Caseltine
    15 Apr 2014 | 5:55 am
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  • Mayo Clinic Radio: Diabetes/Artificial Pancreas

    Joel Streed
    11 Apr 2014 | 9:23 am
    Miss the show? Here is the podcast: Mayo Clinic Radio Full Show 3-12-14 Join us on Saturday, April 12, at 9 a.m. CT when we discuss the growing problem of diabetes with endocrinologist Dr. Ananda Basu.  We’ll touch on the differences between type 1 and type 2 diabetes, and discuss who’s at risk and what can be done to treat the condition, including the status on the development of an artificial pancreas.  Join us! Myth or Matter of Fact:  Diabetics need a special diet. Follow #MayoClinicRadio and tweet your questions. Mayo Clinic Radio is available on iHeart Radio.   Click…
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    Diversity in Education Blog

  • A simple story in science

    Carl Gustafson
    24 Apr 2014 | 2:22 pm
    “Whatever America hopes to bring to pass in the world must first come to pass in the heart of America.” –Dwight Eisenhower I recently got my passport, and the above quote is inscribed on pages 7 and 8. I read it and immediately translated it to “Whatever the Ph.D. student hopes to bring to pass in the Ph.D. must first come to pass in the heart of the Ph.D student.” That interpretation may be stretching the bounds of my “artistic license”, but hey, it’s inspirational. The list of things I would like to bring to pass in my Ph.D. is fairly short; after “make a world-changing…
  • 107 students+ 42 volunteers= 1 successful event

    Crystal Mendoza
    3 Apr 2014 | 4:38 pm
    By: Robin Willenbring Volunteer teaching elementary students about neuroanatomy using real animal brains. On a monthly basis, medical and graduate students receive an email from the Brainwaves team with the subject line containing some phrase including “Brainwaves Event”. Let’s be honest; a good portion of people automatically delete this. One reason might be that you have no idea what Brainwaves is (I know this because I have received guilt ridden apologies from people). Since you delete these emails (disclaimer: in the future you should actually read them), you most likely have no…
  • A New Frontier, Palliative Care in Ethiopia

    Andrew M. Harrsion
    27 Mar 2014 | 7:57 pm
    By Matthew J. Borgo From February 23 through March 1, 2014, I had an experience which I will not soon forget. I had the great fortune of being able to travel to Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, spend time with the Gynecology/Obstetrics/Oncology team at Zewditu Memorial Hospital, and attend the 50th Annual Meeting of the Ethiopian Medical Association (EMA) in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. The theme of this anniversary meeting was Medical Tourism and Healthcare and over one thousand health professionals were in attendance. Ethiopia is a country of many different ethnic groups. With a population estimated at…
  • Embracing Diversity

    Crystal Mendoza
    14 Mar 2014 | 2:23 pm
    I never considered myself diverse. I know this may sound contradictory considering I’m writing for the Education in Diversity Blog, but let me explain. I grew up in El Paso, TX, one of the many cities along the U.S.-Mexico border. The border encompasses Texas, New Mexico, Arizona, and California on the U.S. side and Tamaulipas, Nuevo León, Coahuila, Chihuahua, Sonora, and Baja California Norte on the Mexican side. Both of my parents were born in Chihuahua, Mexico and moved to the United Sates when they were kids. Years later, they met and had me here in the U.S. thus making me…
  • Choosing Your Thesis Lab

    Clara Castillejobecerra
    28 Feb 2014 | 12:38 pm
    During this time, most graduate students are busily wrapping up their last laboratory rotations and thinking about which one to choose. Some students have an easier time deciding which lab to join, but other students such as myself have a harder time making this decision. Committing to a lab is especially daunting when you start considering the great implications of this decision, not only during your PhD studies, but also in your future career in general. Since many of us are in this position, I think it is of great importance to have a few considerations when deciding which lab to join.
 
 
 
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