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  • Josh Russell Faces His Toughest Battle

    Sharing Mayo Clinic
    Hoyt Finnamore
    17 Nov 2014 | 2:24 pm
    Josh Russell spent four years in the U.S. Marine Corps. But he says his toughest battle took place years after he left the military. In early 2011, Josh noticed a bump in his stomach around his navel. He thought the bump was a hernia, and his doctor initially agreed. Josh was scheduled for surgery, but pre-op blood work revealed surprising news. Russell’s “hernia” was actually a tumor. He had testicular cancer. “I was in shock,” says the Benton, Wisconsin, resident. But he didn’t have time to dwell on that. “I got the news on a Friday and started chemotherapy on Monday.” Four…
  • Mayo Clinic Researchers Seek Solutions for Treatment Resistant Depression

    Advancing The Science
    Bob Nellis
    13 Nov 2014 | 8:44 am
    Editor’s note: The following post is by Susannah Tye, Ph.D., researcher in Mayo’s Department of Psychiatry and Psychology. She and her team will be presenting at the Society for Neuroscience meeting in Washington, D.C. next week. Susannah Tye, Ph.D. An important issue in the treatment of depression is development of new and effective treatments for those patients that do not respond effectively to available antidepressant therapies. Such individuals are diagnosed with treatment resistant depression. Without effective treatment, these individuals can suffer for months or years limited or…
  • Optimal Vs. Good Enough

    Mayo Clinic Center for Innovation
    center_for_innovation
    19 Nov 2014 | 9:44 am
      Post Originally Published on LinkedIn by Ron Amodeo   The Irish Elk was the largest deer that ever lived. It's antlers were massive, spanning twelve feet across. But it thrived for only a short time -- maybe four hundred thousand years (400,000 B.C - 8,000 B.C.), through periods of repeated glaciation. With few predators and abundant territory, the elk grew enormously over the centuries, almost seven feet high at the shoulder. Then the environment changed for good. Resources disappeared. And the elk vanished, leaving only fossils and questions around why it failed to adapt and…
  • Mayo Clinic Radio: Pancreatic Cancer

    Mayo Clinic News Network » Radio
    McCray
    18 Nov 2014 | 6:03 pm
    Many of us might not really know where our pancreas is located or what it does, but one thing we DO know is that a diagnosis of pancreatic cancer has a poor prognosis, even when discovered early.  Pancreatic cancer typically spreads rapidly and is seldom detected in its early stages, which is a major reason why it's a leading cause of cancer death.  On the next Mayo Clinic Radio, Saturday, November 22 at 9 a.m. CT,we'll be joined by KMarie Reid Lombardo, M.D., and Gloria Petersen, Ph.D., to discuss signs and symptoms of pancreatic cancer, how it is diagnosed and what the future holds in…
  • Overcoming Imposter Syndrome

    Diversity in Education Blog
    Crystal Mendoza
    20 Nov 2014 | 3:14 pm
    In the midst of studying for my written qualifying exam, I began to panic. It was a mixed panic, the jitters you get before a big exam coupled with a crippling self-doubt. I had experienced this same self-doubt before, when I was first accepted into Mayo Graduate School (MGS). I did not feel like I had earned my place in graduate school, especially at Mayo Clinic, and that my accomplishments felt like nothing compared to those of my peers. I came into graduate school with only two years of “real” college experience, as I had taken dual credit courses in high school and lacked substantial…
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    Sharing Mayo Clinic

  • Josh Russell Faces His Toughest Battle

    Hoyt Finnamore
    17 Nov 2014 | 2:24 pm
    Josh Russell spent four years in the U.S. Marine Corps. But he says his toughest battle took place years after he left the military. In early 2011, Josh noticed a bump in his stomach around his navel. He thought the bump was a hernia, and his doctor initially agreed. Josh was scheduled for surgery, but pre-op blood work revealed surprising news. Russell’s “hernia” was actually a tumor. He had testicular cancer. “I was in shock,” says the Benton, Wisconsin, resident. But he didn’t have time to dwell on that. “I got the news on a Friday and started chemotherapy on Monday.” Four…
  • Not Ready to Slow Down

    Hoyt Finnamore
    5 Nov 2014 | 7:33 am
    A second opinion at Mayo Clinic helped Harold Magy return to the active schedule he loves For years, Harold Magy was familiar with the inner workings of Mayo Clinic. As a mechanical engineer for more than two decades with a company that frequently worked with Mayo, he knew the ins and outs of many of the clinic’s complex mechanical systems in Rochester, Minnesota. But during that time, he was never a patient at Mayo, and he never thought he would be. "I have had heart problems for a long time," says Harold. "I always took care of it with my local doctors. I didn't think about going anywhere…
  • Patient Attributes Health to Excellent Care, A Generous Donor, and a Terrible Spider Bite

    Hoyt Finnamore
    30 Oct 2014 | 1:40 pm
    You never know how an experience – even a negative experience – can shape the rest of your life. Decades ago, when Jane Applen-Anderson came to Mayo Clinic Hospital, Methodist Campus, in Rochester with her leg swollen to three times its usual size, she wasn’t thinking about what good could come out of it. She would come to learn she’d been bitten by a poisonous brown recluse spider. Mayo Clinic doctors treated her infection, removed the dead tissue, and worked to repair the damage done. They saved her leg, and they saved her life. That was just the first time. While in the hospital,…
  • Learning to Hear Again

    Hoyt Finnamore
    15 Oct 2014 | 11:17 am
    There are certain sounds that Scott Malmstrom had never known. He was born with hearing impairment, and it gradually got worse throughout his life. By fourth grade, he began experimenting with hearing aids. Over time, he became what he calls a “professional lip reader.” Hearing aids didn’t help much with the type of hearing loss Scott had. “Where he struggled was speech discrimination – being able to recognize and understand what's being said,” he says. “That's where they eyes take over. That's what I've done over many years and became very good at it.” But his diminished…
  • “I Feel Like Me Again”

    Hoyt Finnamore
    6 Oct 2014 | 9:14 am
    Carly Edgar faced a mystery illness, the baffling effects of a rare autoimmune disease, and the prospect of reconstructive surgery, but she found hope and help at Mayo Clinic. In January 2013, Carly Edgar, an otherwise healthy 20-something, found herself in the hospital and in severe pain. The pain seemed to originate from near one of her ribs, but her local doctors couldn’t identify the source. She spent a week in the hospital without any answer. She was released, but it wasn’t long until she was back again. Carly rated her pain at 10 on a 10-point scale, but doctors started to doubt her…
 
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    Advancing The Science

  • Mayo Clinic Researchers Seek Solutions for Treatment Resistant Depression

    Bob Nellis
    13 Nov 2014 | 8:44 am
    Editor’s note: The following post is by Susannah Tye, Ph.D., researcher in Mayo’s Department of Psychiatry and Psychology. She and her team will be presenting at the Society for Neuroscience meeting in Washington, D.C. next week. Susannah Tye, Ph.D. An important issue in the treatment of depression is development of new and effective treatments for those patients that do not respond effectively to available antidepressant therapies. Such individuals are diagnosed with treatment resistant depression. Without effective treatment, these individuals can suffer for months or years limited or…
  • We Can Do More! Be an Advocate for Cancer Research Funding

    Nicole Brudos Ferrara
    23 Oct 2014 | 9:25 am
    The post below was written by Toni Kay Mangskau, clinical trials referral coordinator at Mayo Clinic Cancer Center and an active volunteer for the American Cancer Society and the National Patient Advocate Foundation. September 2014 was the 10th anniversary of the death of my brother-in-law, Bruce, from cancer. I carry close to my heart a family conversation about Bruce urgently looking for any clinical trial opportunities in the world so he could possibly have more time to live. Unfortunately, his health declined and he was hospitalized in intensive care. As I walked into his hospital room,…
  • Mayo Physicians Appointed to Florida Alzheimer’s Board

    Bob Nellis
    13 Oct 2014 | 8:24 am
    Leonard Petrucell, Ph.D. Neill Graff-Radford, M.D. Two Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville specialists in Alzheimer’s disease — neurologist Neill Graff-Radford, M.D., and molecular neuroscientist Leonard Petrucelli, Ph.D. — have been appointed to Florida’s Alzheimer’s Disease Research Grant Advisory Board. The appointment was made on Oct. 3 by State Surgeon General John Armstrong, M.D., FACS, who is also the Florida Secretary of Health. The 11-member board is a component of the new Ed and Ethel Moore Alzheimer’s Disease Research Program that will assist in the effort to fund research…
  • Photon counting CT Scanner makes research debut

    Bob Nellis
    8 Oct 2014 | 8:27 am
    Dr. Cynthia McCollough of Mayo Clinic and Dr. Thomas Flohr of Siemens. The arrival of a new CT scanner at Mayo Clinic is not usually worthy of a ribbon cutting ceremony, but this isn't your ordinary scanner. Destined solely for research, the first photon-counting-detector-based spectral CT  to be put into service anywhere was recently delivered to Mayo's Radiology Research Division. Obtained through a grant from the National Institutes of Health, the machine provides spatial resolution and material discrimination sensitivity at much lower radiation doses than conventional scanners. Reducing…
  • Kidney cancer survivor joins Mayo experts to share the changing treatment of kidney cancer

    Bob Nellis
    18 Sep 2014 | 9:22 am
    Cynthia Chauhan joins Winston Tan, M.D., and Al Copland, Ph.D., both from the Mayo Clinic in Florida, for our second blog post in a lengthy series about kidney cancer. Cynthia is a Mayo Clinic patient who is a kidney and breast cancer survivor, leader of a kidney cancer survivor group, and patient advocate. Cynthia would like to share her thoughts on clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC), the most common form of kidney cancer and the diagnosis that she received over 16 years ago. Chauhan: ccRCC is an aggressive cancer which, with the exception of high dose IL2, a difficult treatment with…
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    Mayo Clinic Center for Innovation

  • Optimal Vs. Good Enough

    center_for_innovation
    19 Nov 2014 | 9:44 am
      Post Originally Published on LinkedIn by Ron Amodeo   The Irish Elk was the largest deer that ever lived. It's antlers were massive, spanning twelve feet across. But it thrived for only a short time -- maybe four hundred thousand years (400,000 B.C - 8,000 B.C.), through periods of repeated glaciation. With few predators and abundant territory, the elk grew enormously over the centuries, almost seven feet high at the shoulder. Then the environment changed for good. Resources disappeared. And the elk vanished, leaving only fossils and questions around why it failed to adapt and…
  • Without Change There is no Innovation

    center_for_innovation
    17 Nov 2014 | 6:32 am
          _______
  • Why Elegant Integration is Now the Focus of Innovation

    center_for_innovation
    14 Nov 2014 | 9:33 am
        Larry Keeley opened his Transform 2014 presentation, Sometimes things change … by reminding the audience that, in reality, things change all the time. Change is unstoppable. Keeley, the president and co-founder of innovation consulting firm Doblin, Inc. and author of Ten Types of Innovation: The Discipline of Building Breakthroughs says we're in one of the biggest times of change in the history of our species. The biggest single change in our lifetime is interconnectedness, he says, and innovation is the discipline, science and emerging new set of practices that will allow us…
  • Are You Ready for Big Data?

    center_for_innovation
    12 Nov 2014 | 9:13 am
      In his June 26, 2014 presentation for Thinking Differently: The CFI Series of Unexpected Conversations, Jim Hackett addressed a topic that is top of mind for many organizations  – Big Data.  In his talk titled, “Are You Ready for Big Data?” Jim asserts that it is not just the data, but what we do with it and how can we be “data informed” vs “data driven”.     Jim Hackett is Vice Chair of the Board of Directors of Steelcase Inc., the global leader in the office furniture industry. Jim retired from the CEO role at Steelcase in February 2014 after overseeing all…
  • Innovation Can Be a Laughing Matter

    center_for_innovation
    10 Nov 2014 | 6:05 am
          _______
 
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    Mayo Clinic News Network » Radio

  • Mayo Clinic Radio: Pancreatic Cancer

    McCray
    18 Nov 2014 | 6:03 pm
    Many of us might not really know where our pancreas is located or what it does, but one thing we DO know is that a diagnosis of pancreatic cancer has a poor prognosis, even when discovered early.  Pancreatic cancer typically spreads rapidly and is seldom detected in its early stages, which is a major reason why it's a leading cause of cancer death.  On the next Mayo Clinic Radio, Saturday, November 22 at 9 a.m. CT,we'll be joined by KMarie Reid Lombardo, M.D., and Gloria Petersen, Ph.D., to discuss signs and symptoms of pancreatic cancer, how it is diagnosed and what the future holds in…
  • Protected: Downloads for week 11-17-2014

    McCray
    17 Nov 2014 | 12:40 pm
    This content is password protected. To view it please enter your password below: Password:
  • Mayo Clinic Radio: Lung Cancer Screening

    McCray
    12 Nov 2014 | 8:44 am
    If you missed the program when it aired, you will find a podcast here.  November 15 2014. For more information about lung cancer screening call 507-538-0340 Finding lung cancer sooner rather than later can obviously make a big difference in the outcome, and using a CT scan to find the cancer may be the best option.  On the most recent Mayo Clinic Radioour guest was pulmonologist, David Midthun, M.D.  We discussed why lung cancer is so deadly and talk about the importance of diagnosing it early.  We also  talked to a patient who had her lung cancer diagnosed with a CT scan.  November is…
  • Protected: Downloads for week of 11-10-2014

    Audrey Caseltine
    10 Nov 2014 | 6:34 am
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  • Mayo Clinic Radio: Heart Summit – Repair, Replace, Regenerate

    McCray
    5 Nov 2014 | 9:07 am
      Miss the show? Here's the podcast! Mayo Clinic Radio Full Show 11-8-2014 44min mp3   On Mayo Clinic Radio, Saturday, November 8 at 9 a.m. CT,we discussed the  latest news from the Mayo Clinic Cardiology + Structural Heart Disease: Innovation Summit 2014.  Replacing or repairing someone's heart valve through a blood vessel is a modern-day marvel.  We found out how they do it. Plus, regenerating damaged heart tissue is a new frontier in cardiac care.  Repair, replace and regenerate - how the newest innovations can save your heart.  Experts Charles Bruce, M.D., and Rakesh…
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    Diversity in Education Blog

  • Overcoming Imposter Syndrome

    Crystal Mendoza
    20 Nov 2014 | 3:14 pm
    In the midst of studying for my written qualifying exam, I began to panic. It was a mixed panic, the jitters you get before a big exam coupled with a crippling self-doubt. I had experienced this same self-doubt before, when I was first accepted into Mayo Graduate School (MGS). I did not feel like I had earned my place in graduate school, especially at Mayo Clinic, and that my accomplishments felt like nothing compared to those of my peers. I came into graduate school with only two years of “real” college experience, as I had taken dual credit courses in high school and lacked substantial…
  • What are we eating?

    Carl Gustafson
    9 Oct 2014 | 5:31 pm
    Contrary to popular belief, Facebook can be good for something every now and then. While wasting precious time on Facebook (shh! don’t tell my PI!), I stumbled across this blog post, by an endocrinologist in California who compared his dining experience at the Googleplex, to his dining experiences at various hospitals. I sure hope Google starts hiring pharmacologists because his blog raved about the cafeteria food in Mountain View. I don’t know about you, but a good salad bar and a name like “Mountain View” is enough to make me want to apply for a position. This article spurred me a…
  • Gender Equality: Women’s Rights are Human Rights

    Andrew M. Harrsion
    1 Oct 2014 | 7:48 pm
    By Wells B. LaRiviere Note: Sex refers to the biological assignment of reproductive anatomy, while gender refers to a spectrum of social and cultural roles associated with sex. This post touches on both, but for the sake of brevity, I will not explore this complex subject further. On the afternoon of September 18th, 2014, Dr. Karen Hedin (Professor, Mayo Clinic Department of Immunology) hosted a discussion entitled “Women in Science: Problems and Brainstorming Solutions,” an important extension of the ongoing discussion of sex equality at Mayo Clinic. The conference room on the 15th floor…
  • The Greatest Taboo: Mental Illness, Society, Science, and Medicine

    Andrew M. Harrsion
    11 Sep 2014 | 10:04 pm
    By Andrew M. Harrison In 1902, Bertrand Russell wrote, “Mathematics, rightly viewed, possesses not only truth, but supreme beauty—a beauty cold and austere, like that of sculpture, without appeal to any part of our weaker nature, without the gorgeous trappings of painting or music, yet sublimely pure, and capable of a stern perfection such as only the greatest art can show.” Beautiful words by one of my heroes and also the pathetic opening to my medical school application essay in the summer of 2009. I did not even get the date correct, but it did not matter then and does not matter…
  • Avoiding a Career as a Perpetual Postdoc

    Clara Castillejobecerra
    4 Sep 2014 | 6:17 am
    As trainees, we are faced with a frustrating reality-- the job market cannot meet the increasing supply of PhDs. We know this and most of us decide to pursue further postdoctoral training in order to become more qualified for the limited positions. Unfortunately, the few years we anticipate for postdoctoral training can extend longer than desired, thereby causing many of us to become stuck in perpetual postdoctoral work. Disillusioned by the process, a portion of us will abandon our initial career goals to settle for less than desired or just leave science altogether. But are some of us…
 
 
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