Mayo Clinic

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  • From ‘Pick a Plot’ to Watching His Son Graduate

    Sharing Mayo Clinic
    Hoyt Finnamore
    12 Dec 2014 | 2:03 pm
    Read time: 4 minutes Written by Ron Christian “Pick a plot and get your papers in order, you’ll be dead in a month.” That’s what the local neurosurgeon said. Those words served as my wake-up call. While my wife wept, I became angry. We had three very young children, and I was determined to see them grow up. Weeks before, I had two seizures. The second seizure resulted in hospitalization, and within hours I was diagnosed with a brain tumor. The local neurosurgeon did a biopsy and then gave his instructions on how to spend the little bit of time I had left … finding a plot. After…
  • Mayo Clinic Plugs Into Drug Discovery

    Advancing The Science
    Bob Nellis
    15 Dec 2014 | 6:05 am
    The research laboratory of Mayo Clinic pediatric oncologist Richard J. Bram, M.D., Ph.D., was enjoying the kind of success many researchers hope for. His team in Rochester, Minnesota, had long been interested in studying brain tumors, particularly those in children. “They’re the second most common malignancy in children, but the development of cures has lagged,” Dr. Bram says. Dr. Bram’s research team made a big discovery: They found that a particular protein called cyclophilin B turned up in abundance in glioblastomas and medulloblastomas, two deadly nervous system tumors. The…
  • Designing for Consequence

    Mayo Clinic Center for Innovation
    center_for_innovation
    17 Dec 2014 | 1:43 pm
        Lorna Ross, Director of Design at the Center for Innovation at Mayo Clinic, discusses how design can be used as an agent for change in complex systems such as health care at the Service Design Network in Sweden.   She showcases projects and case studies, and shares lessons learned throughout her career in Service Design. She also focuses on how service design has evolved to adapt to a clinical context, and how creativity and imagination can gain credibility in an evidence-based culture.     Find out more about the Center for Innovation.      …
  • Mayo Clinic Radio: Medical News of 2014

    Mayo Clinic News Network » Radio
    McCray
    16 Dec 2014 | 7:24 am
    We're taking a look back at some of the important medical news of 2014! This Saturday, December 20, at 9 a.m. CT, we'll discuss a less invasive way to test for colon cancer with David Ahlquist, M.D..  We'll also talk about research that led to using the measles vaccine to fight cancer with Stephen Russell, M.D. Ph.D..  Anthony Windebank, M.D. will share the discovery of using stem cells to unravel the mysteries of ALS, and we'll find out about robots that help diagnose patients suffering from stroke or concussion from Bart Demaerschalk, M.D.. There are a lot of wonderful medical…
  • Adapting to Rochester

    Diversity in Education Blog
    Annyoceli Santiago
    8 Dec 2014 | 12:07 pm
    By Annyoceli Santiago I remember when I was accepted into the Postbaccalaureate Research Education Program (PREP) at Mayo Clinic two years ago. I was extremely excited about moving to the United States to do research. When I told my friends and professors that I had been accepted to PREP, most of them said “…but there’s nothing in Rochester!”. It really didn’t take away my enthusiasm because I was mostly thinking about the research… And after all, no distractions were great because I could focus on work. After my first week, I already had a group of friends and was introduced to…
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    Sharing Mayo Clinic

  • From ‘Pick a Plot’ to Watching His Son Graduate

    Hoyt Finnamore
    12 Dec 2014 | 2:03 pm
    Read time: 4 minutes Written by Ron Christian “Pick a plot and get your papers in order, you’ll be dead in a month.” That’s what the local neurosurgeon said. Those words served as my wake-up call. While my wife wept, I became angry. We had three very young children, and I was determined to see them grow up. Weeks before, I had two seizures. The second seizure resulted in hospitalization, and within hours I was diagnosed with a brain tumor. The local neurosurgeon did a biopsy and then gave his instructions on how to spend the little bit of time I had left … finding a plot. After…
  • An Answer to Chronic Pain Through Community

    Hoyt Finnamore
    10 Dec 2014 | 3:13 pm
    Read time: 7 minutes Kylee Swensrud doesn’t want to talk about the bad stuff. About how the chronic back pain she’s been living with for the past few years caused emotional distress and drove a wedge between her parents, or the weight it placed on her older sister over concern for her. And she especially doesn’t want to talk about how it rendered a vibrant, outgoing teenager essentially lifeless. “I don’t want to focus on how negative all of this was,” Kylee, now 19, says. “But I do want people to understand that I literally had no life. It truly was like a living hell. It was…
  • Celebrating Nurse Anesthetist Education – Edith Graham Mayo

    Hoyt Finnamore
    1 Dec 2014 | 9:47 am
    To recognize the 125th anniversary of nurse anesthetist education and the role of nurse anesthetist at Mayo Clinic, Sharing Mayo Clinic will include a special series of posts throughout the coming year. These vignettes will describe how nurse anesthesia education has changed over time and will highlight influential Mayo Clinic nurse anesthetists. Those featured received their education at Mayo Clinic and went on to be instrumental in providing anesthesia education and make significant contributions to anesthesia practice. Written by Darlene Bannon and Evadne Edwards  In every pioneering…
  • Learning a New Way to Live, With Pain

    Hoyt Finnamore
    21 Nov 2014 | 12:56 pm
    Look at Carl White today and you see a busy, content family man. A husband and father of two, Carl recently completed his bachelor's degree and now is pursuing a master's in social work. When he's not in school or studying, you'll likely find him either at his job as a health unit coordinator at Mayo Clinic Hopsital, Saint Marys Campus, in Rochester, Minnesota, or spending time with his family. At first glance, Carl may seem like any typical, hardworking dad. Rewind a few years, though, and you'll understand just how far Carl has come and the enormous struggles he has had to overcome. Back in…
  • Josh Russell Faces His Toughest Battle

    Hoyt Finnamore
    17 Nov 2014 | 2:24 pm
    Josh Russell spent four years in the U.S. Marine Corps. But he says his toughest battle took place years after he left the military. In early 2011, Josh noticed a bump in his stomach around his navel. He thought the bump was a hernia, and his doctor initially agreed. Josh was scheduled for surgery, but pre-op blood work revealed surprising news. Russell’s “hernia” was actually a tumor. He had testicular cancer. “I was in shock,” says the Benton, Wisconsin, resident. But he didn’t have time to dwell on that. “I got the news on a Friday and started chemotherapy on Monday.” Four…
 
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    Advancing The Science

  • Mayo Clinic Plugs Into Drug Discovery

    Bob Nellis
    15 Dec 2014 | 6:05 am
    The research laboratory of Mayo Clinic pediatric oncologist Richard J. Bram, M.D., Ph.D., was enjoying the kind of success many researchers hope for. His team in Rochester, Minnesota, had long been interested in studying brain tumors, particularly those in children. “They’re the second most common malignancy in children, but the development of cures has lagged,” Dr. Bram says. Dr. Bram’s research team made a big discovery: They found that a particular protein called cyclophilin B turned up in abundance in glioblastomas and medulloblastomas, two deadly nervous system tumors. The…
  • nuSURF Students Best Advocates for Science

    Bob Nellis
    9 Dec 2014 | 1:01 pm
    Mayo Clinic's 2014 SURF team Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowships are awarded every year to deserving students who are interested in exploring specific topics in research. The goal, in addition to learning alongside professional medical researchers, is to determine if the students are truly interested in persuing research as a career. The students do everything a scientist does, including presenting findings at the end of their project. Mayo Clinic's bumper crop of nuSURF students (nu for nephrology and urology) did rather well this year, according to mentor Michael Romero, Ph.D.
  • Biomarker Discovery: Staying One Step Ahead of Cancer

    Bob Nellis
    4 Dec 2014 | 12:01 pm
    Four researchers at Mayo Clinic combined their talents to spur a “bedside to bench” movement that takes the issues they face in the clinic back to the laboratory in the hopes of discovering biomarkers to help specific patients facing difficult medical problems. George Vasmatzis, Ph.D., co-director of Mayo Clinic’s Biomarker Discovery Program in the Center for Individualized Medicine, has joined thoracic surgeon Dennis Wigle, M.D., Ph.D., urologist R. Jeffrey Karnes, M.D., and hematopathologist Andrew L. Feldman, M.D., in harnessing the power of biomarkers to benefit their patients. This…
  • Mayo Clinic Researchers Seek Solutions for Treatment Resistant Depression

    Bob Nellis
    13 Nov 2014 | 8:44 am
    Editor’s note: The following post is by Susannah Tye, Ph.D., researcher in Mayo’s Department of Psychiatry and Psychology. She and her team will be presenting at the Society for Neuroscience meeting in Washington, D.C. next week. Susannah Tye, Ph.D. An important issue in the treatment of depression is development of new and effective treatments for those patients that do not respond effectively to available antidepressant therapies. Such individuals are diagnosed with treatment resistant depression. Without effective treatment, these individuals can suffer for months or years limited or…
  • We Can Do More! Be an Advocate for Cancer Research Funding

    Nicole Brudos Ferrara
    23 Oct 2014 | 9:25 am
    The post below was written by Toni Kay Mangskau, clinical trials referral coordinator at Mayo Clinic Cancer Center and an active volunteer for the American Cancer Society and the National Patient Advocate Foundation. September 2014 was the 10th anniversary of the death of my brother-in-law, Bruce, from cancer. I carry close to my heart a family conversation about Bruce urgently looking for any clinical trial opportunities in the world so he could possibly have more time to live. Unfortunately, his health declined and he was hospitalized in intensive care. As I walked into his hospital room,…
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    Mayo Clinic Center for Innovation

  • Designing for Consequence

    center_for_innovation
    17 Dec 2014 | 1:43 pm
        Lorna Ross, Director of Design at the Center for Innovation at Mayo Clinic, discusses how design can be used as an agent for change in complex systems such as health care at the Service Design Network in Sweden.   She showcases projects and case studies, and shares lessons learned throughout her career in Service Design. She also focuses on how service design has evolved to adapt to a clinical context, and how creativity and imagination can gain credibility in an evidence-based culture.     Find out more about the Center for Innovation.      …
  • Design Creates Culture

    center_for_innovation
    15 Dec 2014 | 8:52 am
  • Changing the Expectations of Health Care Roles

    center_for_innovation
    10 Dec 2014 | 1:42 pm
        Mark D. Smith, MD, MBA, knows America’s healthcare system like few others. After earning degrees from Harvard, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania, Smith has taught at Johns Hopkins, served as an attending physician at San Francisco General Hospital, and founded the California HealthCare Foundation, which he operated for nearly 18 years. All these experiences, along with his lengthy repertoire of national level committee and board positions, have made him quite an authority when it comes to the direction of…
  • Predicting the Future

    center_for_innovation
    8 Dec 2014 | 6:20 am
  • Transforming Global Health Care: The Power of Personal Health Technologies

    center_for_innovation
    5 Dec 2014 | 9:23 am
        At age 19, when Eric Dishman was diagnosed with cancer, full kidney failure and given 9 months to live he believed the diagnosis. He admits that the moment he heard the prognosis of “9 months and cancer” he became a “passive patient.” Dishman shared his personal story about his battle with cancer and his healthcare experiences. He talked about the transformation he had to “make the health care system do” for an eventually “proactive patient” like himself. Through his experience, Dishman discerned that “diagnostic boxes have a powerful gravity. The diagnosis…
 
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    Mayo Clinic News Network » Radio

  • Mayo Clinic Radio: Medical News of 2014

    McCray
    16 Dec 2014 | 7:24 am
    We're taking a look back at some of the important medical news of 2014! This Saturday, December 20, at 9 a.m. CT, we'll discuss a less invasive way to test for colon cancer with David Ahlquist, M.D..  We'll also talk about research that led to using the measles vaccine to fight cancer with Stephen Russell, M.D. Ph.D..  Anthony Windebank, M.D. will share the discovery of using stem cells to unravel the mysteries of ALS, and we'll find out about robots that help diagnose patients suffering from stroke or concussion from Bart Demaerschalk, M.D.. There are a lot of wonderful medical…
  • Protected: Downloads for week 12-15-2014

    Audrey Caseltine
    15 Dec 2014 | 7:20 am
    This content is password protected. To view it please enter your password below: Password:
  • Mayo Clinic Radio: Adult Scoliosis

    McCray
    8 Dec 2014 | 2:37 pm
    Tom and Tracy sat down with infectious disease expert Pritish Tosh, M.D., and discussed the latest on influenza: Mayo Clinic Radio Pritish Tosh Flu-12-13-14   Miss the show? Here's the podcast: Mayo Clinic Radio Full Show 12-13-14   Scoliosis is not a condition that develops in just teenagers. The S-shaped or C-shaped curve in the spine can happen to anybody at any age. Saturday, December 13, at 9 a.m. CT, orthopedic surgeon Paul Huddleston, M.D., will join us to talk about detecting and treating scoliosis, including surgical options. We'll also discuss osteoporosis, spinal…
  • Protected: Downloads for week 12-8-2014

    Audrey Caseltine
    8 Dec 2014 | 12:50 pm
    This content is password protected. To view it please enter your password below: Password:
  • Mayo Clinic Radio: Liver Transplants

    McCray
    1 Dec 2014 | 4:57 pm
    Miss the show? Here's the podcast! Mayo Clinic Radio Full Show 12-6-14 44min mp3 On Saturday, December 6, at 9 a.m. CT, Julie Heimbach, M.D., and Charles Rosen, M.D., will join us to talk about dramatic changes happening in the world of liver transplants. For instance, it wasn’t long ago that patients with hepatitis B, hepatitis C or a certain type of tumor would not have been eligible for a liver transplant. That's no longer true.  We’ll also discuss a fairly novel approach to patients with obesity-related liver disease, which is to combine liver transplant with bariatric surgery.
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    Diversity in Education Blog

  • Adapting to Rochester

    Annyoceli Santiago
    8 Dec 2014 | 12:07 pm
    By Annyoceli Santiago I remember when I was accepted into the Postbaccalaureate Research Education Program (PREP) at Mayo Clinic two years ago. I was extremely excited about moving to the United States to do research. When I told my friends and professors that I had been accepted to PREP, most of them said “…but there’s nothing in Rochester!”. It really didn’t take away my enthusiasm because I was mostly thinking about the research… And after all, no distractions were great because I could focus on work. After my first week, I already had a group of friends and was introduced to…
  • Overcoming Imposter Syndrome

    Crystal Mendoza
    20 Nov 2014 | 3:14 pm
    In the midst of studying for my written qualifying exam, I began to panic. It was a mixed panic, the jitters you get before a big exam coupled with a crippling self-doubt. I had experienced this same self-doubt before, when I was first accepted into Mayo Graduate School (MGS). I did not feel like I had earned my place in graduate school, especially at Mayo Clinic, and that my accomplishments felt like nothing compared to those of my peers. I came into graduate school with only two years of “real” college experience, as I had taken dual credit courses in high school and lacked substantial…
  • What are we eating?

    Carl Gustafson
    9 Oct 2014 | 5:31 pm
    Contrary to popular belief, Facebook can be good for something every now and then. While wasting precious time on Facebook (shh! don’t tell my PI!), I stumbled across this blog post, by an endocrinologist in California who compared his dining experience at the Googleplex, to his dining experiences at various hospitals. I sure hope Google starts hiring pharmacologists because his blog raved about the cafeteria food in Mountain View. I don’t know about you, but a good salad bar and a name like “Mountain View” is enough to make me want to apply for a position. This article spurred me a…
  • Gender Equality: Women’s Rights are Human Rights

    Andrew M. Harrsion
    1 Oct 2014 | 7:48 pm
    By Wells B. LaRiviere Note: Sex refers to the biological assignment of reproductive anatomy, while gender refers to a spectrum of social and cultural roles associated with sex. This post touches on both, but for the sake of brevity, I will not explore this complex subject further. On the afternoon of September 18th, 2014, Dr. Karen Hedin (Professor, Mayo Clinic Department of Immunology) hosted a discussion entitled “Women in Science: Problems and Brainstorming Solutions,” an important extension of the ongoing discussion of sex equality at Mayo Clinic. The conference room on the 15th floor…
  • The Greatest Taboo: Mental Illness, Society, Science, and Medicine

    Andrew M. Harrsion
    11 Sep 2014 | 10:04 pm
    By Andrew M. Harrison In 1902, Bertrand Russell wrote, “Mathematics, rightly viewed, possesses not only truth, but supreme beauty—a beauty cold and austere, like that of sculpture, without appeal to any part of our weaker nature, without the gorgeous trappings of painting or music, yet sublimely pure, and capable of a stern perfection such as only the greatest art can show.” Beautiful words by one of my heroes and also the pathetic opening to my medical school application essay in the summer of 2009. I did not even get the date correct, but it did not matter then and does not matter…
 
 
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