Mayo Clinic

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  • Gratitude, and the Voice of Experience

    Sharing Mayo Clinic
    Hoyt Finnamore
    24 Feb 2015 | 11:49 am
    Mark Pearce jokes that, "If something's going to happen, it's going to happen to me." That sentiment isn't hard to understand in someone who has had eight joint replacements (knees, hips and shoulders – some more than once), has been cardioverted 18 times to restore normal heart rhythm, and had surgery for a brain tumor. Among other things. What may be harder to understand is how he's kept an amazingly positive attitude through it all. For Mark, it starts with gratitude. "I feel like being treated like royalty here," he says of his experience at Mayo Clinic. "It's amazing. And if there's…
  • Dr. Mark Allen to head Society of Thoracic Surgeons

    Advancing the Science
    Bob Nellis
    6 Feb 2015 | 7:18 am
    Mark Allen, M.D. Mayo Clinic thoracic surgeon Mark S. Allen, M.D., has been elected president of The Society of Thoracic Surgeons during the society’s annual meeting in San Diego. Dr. Allen is a professor of surgery at the Mayo Clinic College of Medicine. His research at Mayo includes serving as principal investigator for a study examining whether removing all lymph nodes in the chest is more effective than removing lymph nodes selectively in patients with stage I or stage II non-small cell lung cancer; the trial is supported by the National Cancer Institute and American College of…
  • How One Family is Enabling People to Power Their Health

    Mayo Clinic Center for Innovation
    center_for_innovation
    26 Feb 2015 | 2:01 pm
        When you are managing your prescriptions and day-to-day life happens, you can't always rely on your memory. Especially with certain prescriptions. This was the hard lesson the founders of Medisafe discovered when their father, forgetting he had already taken his daily prescription, accidentally overdosed. Medisafe is a platform designed for those with multiple prescriptions and is available on both iOS and Android smartphones, as well as Android Watch. We connected with Medisafe's Jon Michaeli to talk about how Medisafe is enabling people to power their own health, as well as…
  • Mayo Clinic Radio: Mucus/Heart-Health Answers/PSA Test

    Mayo Clinic News Network » Radio
    Richard Dietman
    23 Feb 2015 | 4:39 am
    Mucus. It isn’t pretty, but it’s a frontline weapon in the fight against the common cold and sinusitis. On this week’s Mayo Clinic Radio, ENT specialist Dr. Erin O’Brien explains why. Also on the program, Mayo Clinic cardiologist Dr. Rekha Mankad answers listener questions about heart health. And Mayo Clinic urologist Dr. Jeffrey Karnes discusses the pros and cons of the PSA test for prostate cancer. Myth or Matter-of-Fact: Humming can improve sinus health. To listen to the program at 9 a.m. Saturday, February 28, click here. Follow #MayoClinicRadio and tweet your questions. Mayo…
  • The Banality of “That’s Nice”

    Diversity in Education Blog
    Andrew M. Harrsion
    26 Feb 2015 | 7:43 pm
    By Nora E. King I sat in Mayo Clinic’s St. Marys Hospital cafeteria with my clinical team, in that awkward way medical students know too well: the attending physician (“consultant” at Mayo Clinic) buys you a cup of coffee and then proceeds to gossip with his buddies for the next 15 minutes. It’s never clear whether you should chuckle along with the stories or pretend to not listen, absorbed in your notes on the patient list. Unusually, the cafeteria was filled with music. “What’s that noise?” someone said. We glanced around and noticed a poster with sepia photos of famous Black…
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    Sharing Mayo Clinic

  • Gratitude, and the Voice of Experience

    Hoyt Finnamore
    24 Feb 2015 | 11:49 am
    Mark Pearce jokes that, "If something's going to happen, it's going to happen to me." That sentiment isn't hard to understand in someone who has had eight joint replacements (knees, hips and shoulders – some more than once), has been cardioverted 18 times to restore normal heart rhythm, and had surgery for a brain tumor. Among other things. What may be harder to understand is how he's kept an amazingly positive attitude through it all. For Mark, it starts with gratitude. "I feel like being treated like royalty here," he says of his experience at Mayo Clinic. "It's amazing. And if there's…
  • World Record Skydiver Credits ‘Sam’ for the Ability to Live Life at 100 mph

    Paul Scotti
    20 Feb 2015 | 6:04 am
    He’s a former Green Beret who served in Somalia. He’s a record-holding skydiver with several thousand jumps under his belt since he began leaping out of airplanes at age 18. And he’s a liver transplant recipient, who affectionately refers to his transplanted organ as “Sam.” Kim Dobson, 63, of Oveido, Florida, is the definition of someone who lives life to the fullest. He not only participates in national and international skydiving competitions, but also scuba dives, plays golf, and enjoys shooting sports. With both a sports and military background, he was active, fit and the…
  • Breaking Away From Pain With the Help of ‘The Scrambler’

    Hoyt Finnamore
    19 Feb 2015 | 9:27 am
    Participating in a clinical trial gave Karen Safranek a solution to her decade-long struggle with peripheral neuropathy  Karen Safranek didn't take a worry-free step for 10 years. Severe peripheral neuropathy — a side effect of breast cancer treatment she received in 2002 — left her with constant burning, tingling, numbness and pain in both her feet. Over time, Karen tried dozens of treatments to rid herself of the discomfort. Nothing worked. So in 2012 when she found out about a clinical research trial available at Mayo Clinic for people who had peripheral neuropathy after…
  • Faith and Mayo Clinic Help Cancer Survivor Overcome Multiple Health Battles

    Paul Scotti
    18 Feb 2015 | 7:46 am
    Mayo Clinic patient Donald Jones, of Ponte Vedra, Florida, with his wife, Beth. When 53-year-old Donald Jones of Ponte Vedra, Florida, found out he had lung cancer, the former smoker accepted it as a challenge that he was prepared to fight and win. Little did he know the other serious health issues that lay ahead, which would create serious new challenges for him over the next year. An avid golfer and hiker, Donald could tell something wasn’t right with his breathing after a hiking trip to the Smoky Mountains in 2013. A visit to his physician resulted in tests that showed a spot on his…
  • Mayo Patient, Staffer Run Phoenix 10K Together

    Hoyt Finnamore
    6 Feb 2015 | 9:17 am
    Mayo Clinic patient Don Salamone is proof that being in great shape before undergoing a heart transplant can enhance recovery. Even while tethered to a ventricular assist device that kept his heart functioning until the transplant surgery, he pushed himself to work out on a stationary bike for two hours daily and walked several miles on a treadmill. While he could handily beat the competition in races before he received the implanted device, he couldn’t beat viral cardiomyopathy, which makes it harder for your heart to pump and deliver blood to the rest of your body, and can lead to heart…
 
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    Advancing the Science

  • Dr. Mark Allen to head Society of Thoracic Surgeons

    Bob Nellis
    6 Feb 2015 | 7:18 am
    Mark Allen, M.D. Mayo Clinic thoracic surgeon Mark S. Allen, M.D., has been elected president of The Society of Thoracic Surgeons during the society’s annual meeting in San Diego. Dr. Allen is a professor of surgery at the Mayo Clinic College of Medicine. His research at Mayo includes serving as principal investigator for a study examining whether removing all lymph nodes in the chest is more effective than removing lymph nodes selectively in patients with stage I or stage II non-small cell lung cancer; the trial is supported by the National Cancer Institute and American College of…
  • “One Size Fits All” Doesn’t Apply to Quality Improvement

    Elizabeth Zimmermann Young
    3 Feb 2015 | 1:15 pm
    In an era of rising health care costs, and continuing efforts to improve value for patients nationwide, we have seen the rise of a number of quality improvement and reporting efforts. In his study, published today in the Journal of the American Medical Association, David Etzioni, M.D., and his team, illustrated that seeking a standardized solution is unlikely to provide a universal result. The research team found no difference in postoperative outcomes over time between University HealthSystem Consortium hospitals with and without participation in the American College of Surgeons National…
  • Rheumatoid Arthritis and Heart Disease: Understanding the Connection

    Bob Nellis
    19 Jan 2015 | 11:13 am
    Physicians have long known that people with rheumatoid arthritis and other rheumatic conditions such as lupus are more likely to die at younger ages than are those without these conditions. Even with advances in treatment, the gap in life expectancy remains. No one knew why until 15 years ago. That’s when researchers at Mayo Clinic helped establish that people with rheumatoid arthritis have a greater chance of developing various types of cardiovascular disease. “We now know that rheumatoid arthritis is associated with an increased risk of heart and vascular disease,” says senior…
  • Collaborating to Enhance Patient Experience

    Elizabeth Zimmermann Young
    16 Jan 2015 | 11:19 am
    “The best interest of the patient is the only interest to be considered, and in order that the sick may have the benefit of advancing knowledge, union of forces is necessary- Dr. William J. Mayo, 1910 The motivation behind Mayo Clinic's many collaborative relationships is to improve patient care. These relationships are focused on finding better ways to engage patients and families in shared decision making; by identifying and implementing best practices to reduce costs and improve outcomes; by inventing new ways to deliver care through new technologies, new treatments, and developing new…
  • A Line in the Sand – Mayo Clinic’s Role in Early Insulin Research

    Bob Nellis
    15 Jan 2015 | 8:15 am
    Early in the 20th century, a desperate group of patients began appearing at Mayo Clinic in the hope that the specialists there could keep them alive. Mostly children and younger adults, they had been afflicted with a condition that only years before would have been a death sentence — type I diabetes. Doctors at Mayo, led by endocrinologist and researcher Russell Wilder, M.D., and a handful of other centers across the country had found a drastic, but feasible method of saving many of them from this deadly disease. Dr. Wilder and his colleague, Walter Boothby, M.D., had formulated a special…
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    Mayo Clinic Center for Innovation

  • How One Family is Enabling People to Power Their Health

    center_for_innovation
    26 Feb 2015 | 2:01 pm
        When you are managing your prescriptions and day-to-day life happens, you can't always rely on your memory. Especially with certain prescriptions. This was the hard lesson the founders of Medisafe discovered when their father, forgetting he had already taken his daily prescription, accidentally overdosed. Medisafe is a platform designed for those with multiple prescriptions and is available on both iOS and Android smartphones, as well as Android Watch. We connected with Medisafe's Jon Michaeli to talk about how Medisafe is enabling people to power their own health, as well as…
  • Engaging the Entire Healthcare Innovation Eco-system

    center_for_innovation
    25 Feb 2015 | 2:36 pm
        This spring, leaders of provider-based healthcare innovation centers and departments will be coming to Rochester, MN to attend the Fifth Innovation Centers Summit Workshop on May 19-20, 2015, put on by BluePrint Healthcare IT. The Summit Workshop will explore “Engaging the Entire Healthcare Innovation Eco-system in Transformation—Inside and Out" over two days. The unique interactive forum will feature participant-generated content in master workshops and breakout brainstorming sessions as well as BluePrint's hallmark speed dating sessions between centers. With a special…
  • Monday Motivation

    center_for_innovation
    23 Feb 2015 | 6:25 am
        ________
  • Reevaluating the Value of Primary Care using Design Thinking

    center_for_innovation
    18 Feb 2015 | 5:11 pm
        It may seem a little out of the ordinary, a healthcare presentation at a design conference, but CFI designer Allison Matthews and primary care provider Marc Matthews presented at the Oslo Systemic Design Conference at the Oslo School of Architecture and Design in Norway. This symposium series explored the interdisciplinary development of design thinking as a progressive practice through systems thinking. Graduate students, academic professionals, and advanced practitioners from around the globe joined in the conversation. The overall question posed was, “How can we reinvent…
  • Front Row to Innovation in Health Care

    center_for_innovation
    16 Feb 2015 | 10:30 am
      Fostering innovation is a primary focus for most organizations but especially those in healthcare. One of the best sources for new healthcare innovations is front-line staff – the proverbial boots-on-the-ground employees. However, in order to tap into their creativity, organizations need to find ways to provide employees with “thinking time” — a critical component to enable creative thinking — empowering employees to work on projects they are passionate about outside of their normal work time. Innovation in health care has never been more important. However, in health care,…
 
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    Mayo Clinic News Network » Radio

  • Mayo Clinic Radio: Mucus/Heart-Health Answers/PSA Test

    Richard Dietman
    23 Feb 2015 | 4:39 am
    Mucus. It isn’t pretty, but it’s a frontline weapon in the fight against the common cold and sinusitis. On this week’s Mayo Clinic Radio, ENT specialist Dr. Erin O’Brien explains why. Also on the program, Mayo Clinic cardiologist Dr. Rekha Mankad answers listener questions about heart health. And Mayo Clinic urologist Dr. Jeffrey Karnes discusses the pros and cons of the PSA test for prostate cancer. Myth or Matter-of-Fact: Humming can improve sinus health. To listen to the program at 9 a.m. Saturday, February 28, click here. Follow #MayoClinicRadio and tweet your questions. Mayo…
  • Protected: Downloads for week of 2-16-2015

    Joel Streed
    16 Feb 2015 | 8:23 am
    This content is password protected. To view it please enter your password below: Password:
  • Mayo Clinic Radio: Cardiac Regeneration/Stop-Smoking Drug/Juicing

    Richard Dietman
    16 Feb 2015 | 6:13 am
    On this week’s Mayo Clinic Radio, fixing a broken heart. Cardiac regeneration uses the body’s own stem cells to repair damage done by heart disease. Mayo Clinic cardiologist Dr. Atta Behfar explains. Also on the program, nicotine dependency expert Dr. Richard Hurt discusses results of a new study about the stop-smoking drug varenicline (Chantix). And Mayo Clinic registered dietitian Katherine Zeratsky explains the risks of juice-only diets. Myth or Matter-of-Fact: Cardiac regeneration may someday replace the need for surgery to repair heart damage. To listen to the program at 9 a.m.
  • Protected: Downloads for week of 2-9-2015

    Joel Streed
    10 Feb 2015 | 1:00 pm
    This content is password protected. To view it please enter your password below: Password:
  • Mayo Clinic Radio: Men’s Heart Health/Children’s Oral Health

    Richard Dietman
    9 Feb 2015 | 4:18 am
    Miss the show? Here's the podcast: Mayo Clinic Radio 02-14-15 podcast Can erectile dysfunction (ED) predict heart disease? Find out on this week’s Mayo Clinic Radio. Cardiologist Dr. Stephen Kopecky explains the connection between ED and possible heart problems. Also on Mayo Clinic Radio, it’s National Children’s Dental Health Month, and Dr. Thomas Salinas discusses children’s oral health. Myth or Matter-of-Fact: Erectile dysfunction can indicate possible heart disease when no other signs are present. Want more info on the Mediterranean Diet? Here is some helpful info…
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    Diversity in Education Blog

  • The Banality of “That’s Nice”

    Andrew M. Harrsion
    26 Feb 2015 | 7:43 pm
    By Nora E. King I sat in Mayo Clinic’s St. Marys Hospital cafeteria with my clinical team, in that awkward way medical students know too well: the attending physician (“consultant” at Mayo Clinic) buys you a cup of coffee and then proceeds to gossip with his buddies for the next 15 minutes. It’s never clear whether you should chuckle along with the stories or pretend to not listen, absorbed in your notes on the patient list. Unusually, the cafeteria was filled with music. “What’s that noise?” someone said. We glanced around and noticed a poster with sepia photos of famous Black…
  • Training in Research and Parenthood

    Clara Castillejobecerra
    29 Jan 2015 | 8:43 am
    Perhaps you are contemplating becoming a parent in the future. If so, you may be wondering how becoming a parent will affect your career, how you will handle your responsibilities as a researcher and parent, or how you will survive these tough years in graduate school with the addition of children. To answer some of these questions, this blog will offer different perspectives and advice from students who have made the decision to become both scientist and parents. c Fan-Chi Hsu, Ph.D. received her doctoral degree from the immunology track in November 2014. She and her husband, Chien-Chang…
  • Avoiding scientific nostalgia

    Carl Gustafson
    4 Jan 2015 | 8:41 pm
    Hello diversity blog readers and welcome to 2015! Thanks for sticking with us; we hope you’re as excited about the future of the blog as we are. If not, keep reading. Maybe someday we'll serve up the post you've been waiting for. Science moves pretty fast [citation needed]. In fact, it’s very difficult to quantify the rate of progress of science (umm, units?), and it seems that experts disagree on how to actually do this. Regardless, it appears that global scientific research output (units?) increases at a rate of 8-9% per year. Compare this to the rate of increase in global computer…
  • Should dual degree training exist?

    Andrew M. Harrsion
    18 Dec 2014 | 4:50 pm
    By Andrew M. Harrison No, I will not be writing about the illustrious EdD-JD. However, please note these are both largely regarded as “professional” doctoral degrees in the US. Although still less relevant in the US, you should know the difference, as most of the rest of the world draws a clear distinction between a research doctorate and a “first professional degree”. As data interferes with effecting social changes (for better or worse), and blogs are by nature not designed to be lengthy, let’s get this part out of the way first and fast. More Commentaries on the subject of MD-PhD…
  • Adapting to Rochester

    Annyoceli Santiago
    8 Dec 2014 | 12:07 pm
    By Annyoceli Santiago I remember when I was accepted into the Postbaccalaureate Research Education Program (PREP) at Mayo Clinic two years ago. I was extremely excited about moving to the United States to do research. When I told my friends and professors that I had been accepted to PREP, most of them said “…but there’s nothing in Rochester!”. It really didn’t take away my enthusiasm because I was mostly thinking about the research… And after all, no distractions were great because I could focus on work. After my first week, I already had a group of friends and was introduced to…
 
 
 
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