Mayo Clinic

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  • Learning to Hear Again

    Sharing Mayo Clinic
    Hoyt Finnamore
    15 Oct 2014 | 11:17 am
    There are certain sounds that Scott Malmstrom had never known. He was born with hearing impairment, and it gradually got worse throughout his life. By fourth grade, he began experimenting with hearing aids. Over time, he became what he calls a “professional lip reader.” Hearing aids didn’t help much with the type of hearing loss Scott had. “Where he struggled was speech discrimination – being able to recognize and understand what's being said,” he says. “That's where they eyes take over. That's what I've done over many years and became very good at it.” But his diminished…
  • We Can Do More! Be an Advocate for Cancer Research Funding

    Advancing The Science
    Nicole Brudos Ferrara
    23 Oct 2014 | 9:25 am
    The post below was written by Toni Kay Mangskau, clinical trials referral coordinator at Mayo Clinic Cancer Center and an active volunteer for the American Cancer Society and the National Patient Advocate Foundation. September 2014 was the 10th anniversary of the death of my brother-in-law, Bruce, from cancer. I carry close to my heart a family conversation about Bruce urgently looking for any clinical trial opportunities in the world so he could possibly have more time to live. Unfortunately, his health declined and he was hospitalized in intensive care. As I walked into his hospital room,…
  • Utilizing Technology to Build a Continuum of Care

    Mayo Clinic Center for Innovation
    Kate Scheffler
    23 Oct 2014 | 12:47 pm
      Each year, Mayo Clinic’s Transform symposium offers a place for healthcare innovators to reimagine and redesign the current challenges facing healthcare. A keynote speaker at this year’s event, Vaughn Kauffman, discusses the impact of consumerism on the healthcare industry and how health insurers play a central role in controlling expenses and improving quality. Principal at PwC’s Health Industries Advisory Services, Kauffman has served a variety of health insurers and providers focused on information technology and business operations. Recently, his work has revolved around…
  • Mayo Clinic Radio: Breast Cancer Awareness

    Mayo Clinic News Network » Radio
    McCray
    21 Oct 2014 | 7:54 am
    October is Breast Cancer Awareness month, and on the next Mayo Clinic Radio, Saturday, October 25 at 9 a.m. CT, two Mayo Clinic Breast Clinic physicians will be with us to discuss the latest in research and the ongoing efforts to diagnose, treat and prevent breast cancer. Director of the Breast Clinic Karthik Ghosh, M.D., and practice chair of the Medical Oncology Breast Group Tufia Haddad, M.D., will be ready  to answer your questions. Please join us. Myth or Fact: Breast feeding reduces the risk of breast cancer. Follow #MayoClinicRadio and tweet your questions. To listen to the…
  • What are we eating?

    Diversity in Education Blog
    Carl Gustafson
    9 Oct 2014 | 5:31 pm
    Contrary to popular belief, Facebook can be good for something every now and then. While wasting precious time on Facebook (shh! don’t tell my PI!), I stumbled across this blog post, by an endocrinologist in California who compared his dining experience at the Googleplex, to his dining experiences at various hospitals. I sure hope Google starts hiring pharmacologists because his blog raved about the cafeteria food in Mountain View. I don’t know about you, but a good salad bar and a name like “Mountain View” is enough to make me want to apply for a position. This article spurred me a…
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    Sharing Mayo Clinic

  • Learning to Hear Again

    Hoyt Finnamore
    15 Oct 2014 | 11:17 am
    There are certain sounds that Scott Malmstrom had never known. He was born with hearing impairment, and it gradually got worse throughout his life. By fourth grade, he began experimenting with hearing aids. Over time, he became what he calls a “professional lip reader.” Hearing aids didn’t help much with the type of hearing loss Scott had. “Where he struggled was speech discrimination – being able to recognize and understand what's being said,” he says. “That's where they eyes take over. That's what I've done over many years and became very good at it.” But his diminished…
  • “I Feel Like Me Again”

    Hoyt Finnamore
    6 Oct 2014 | 9:14 am
    Carly Edgar faced a mystery illness, the baffling effects of a rare autoimmune disease, and the prospect of reconstructive surgery, but she found hope and help at Mayo Clinic. In January 2013, Carly Edgar, an otherwise healthy 20-something, found herself in the hospital and in severe pain. The pain seemed to originate from near one of her ribs, but her local doctors couldn’t identify the source. She spent a week in the hospital without any answer. She was released, but it wasn’t long until she was back again. Carly rated her pain at 10 on a 10-point scale, but doctors started to doubt her…
  • Orchestrating Cancer Treatment Not An Obstacle For International Musician

    Cynthia (Cindy) Weiss
    2 Oct 2014 | 7:33 am
    Alvaro Gomez knows people in several continents and has access to health care in the U.S., Chile and Europe. When the Central Florida resident faced a prostate cancer diagnosis, he polled his acquaintances and doctors near and far and came up with one answer: Mayo Clinic. “I was fortunate that after taking into account the advice from friends and doctors, I came to the conclusion that the best place to go was Mayo Clinic, only an hour-and-a-half from my house,” Gomez says. Gomez leads a busy life as a violinist, music instructor and orchestra conductor in Florida, Chile, Brazil and Italy.
  • Tracking the path of a stroke

    Hoyt Finnamore
    29 Sep 2014 | 6:45 am
    Maryel Andison was a university communications and fundraising specialist living with her husband and children in Winnipeg when she suffered a stroke. It was a warm Sunday morning, she was watering flowers, and she was just 51 years old. Maryel waited three days before deciding to see a doctor. By the time she was referred to a neurologist, she learned there would be more delays, including waiting for the imaging tests that would show exactly what had occurred in her brain. But instead of allowing more time to elapse, she decided to seek advice from Mayo Clinic. Maryel's ties to Mayo go back…
  • Overcoming the Hospital ‘Fear Factor’ to Catch Cancer Early

    Hoyt Finnamore
    24 Sep 2014 | 6:06 am
    Michael Tessmer got out of his parents' car and stared at the hospital building before him. His parents had brought him to a hospital in his home state of Iowa for the first of 14 surgeries to repair a cleft palate. Each time, young Michael would be dropped off on the front steps of the hospital, and he would not see his parents again until the hospital released him. "I don't know if that was hospital policy or what," he says. "But I'd be down there anywhere from two weeks to a month each time, all alone." That did little to instill trust and confidence in the medical world. In fact, it did…
 
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    Advancing The Science

  • We Can Do More! Be an Advocate for Cancer Research Funding

    Nicole Brudos Ferrara
    23 Oct 2014 | 9:25 am
    The post below was written by Toni Kay Mangskau, clinical trials referral coordinator at Mayo Clinic Cancer Center and an active volunteer for the American Cancer Society and the National Patient Advocate Foundation. September 2014 was the 10th anniversary of the death of my brother-in-law, Bruce, from cancer. I carry close to my heart a family conversation about Bruce urgently looking for any clinical trial opportunities in the world so he could possibly have more time to live. Unfortunately, his health declined and he was hospitalized in intensive care. As I walked into his hospital room,…
  • Mayo Physicians Appointed to Florida Alzheimer’s Board

    Bob Nellis
    13 Oct 2014 | 8:24 am
    Leonard Petrucell, Ph.D. Neill Graff-Radford, M.D. Two Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville specialists in Alzheimer’s disease — neurologist Neill Graff-Radford, M.D., and molecular neuroscientist Leonard Petrucelli, Ph.D. — have been appointed to Florida’s Alzheimer’s Disease Research Grant Advisory Board. The appointment was made on Oct. 3 by State Surgeon General John Armstrong, M.D., FACS, who is also the Florida Secretary of Health. The 11-member board is a component of the new Ed and Ethel Moore Alzheimer’s Disease Research Program that will assist in the effort to fund research…
  • Photon counting CT Scanner makes research debut

    Bob Nellis
    8 Oct 2014 | 8:27 am
    Dr. Cynthia McCollough of Mayo Clinic and Dr. Thomas Flohr of Siemens. The arrival of a new CT scanner at Mayo Clinic is not usually worthy of a ribbon cutting ceremony, but this isn't your ordinary scanner. Destined solely for research, the first photon-counting-detector-based spectral CT  to be put into service anywhere was recently delivered to Mayo's Radiology Research Division. Obtained through a grant from the National Institutes of Health, the machine provides spatial resolution and material discrimination sensitivity at much lower radiation doses than conventional scanners. Reducing…
  • Kidney cancer survivor joins Mayo experts to share the changing treatment of kidney cancer

    Bob Nellis
    18 Sep 2014 | 9:22 am
    Cynthia Chauhan joins Winston Tan, M.D., and Al Copland, Ph.D., both from the Mayo Clinic in Florida, for our second blog post in a lengthy series about kidney cancer. Cynthia is a Mayo Clinic patient who is a kidney and breast cancer survivor, leader of a kidney cancer survivor group, and patient advocate. Cynthia would like to share her thoughts on clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC), the most common form of kidney cancer and the diagnosis that she received over 16 years ago. Chauhan: ccRCC is an aggressive cancer which, with the exception of high dose IL2, a difficult treatment with…
  • New Sickle Cell Disease Guidelines from the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute

    Bob Nellis
    10 Sep 2014 | 7:43 am
    A team of international experts including M. Hassan Murad, M.D., Mayo Clinic Preventive Medicine and Mayo Clinic Kern Center for the Science of Health Care Delivery, has published new clinical guidelines for treatment of sickle cell disease (SCD) in this week’s Journal of the American Medical Association. Sickle cell disease is an inherited blood disorder — a condition in which there aren't enough healthy red blood cells to carry adequate oxygen throughout the body, resulting in anemia, infections and pain. SCD affects nearly 100,000 people in the United States and is associated with many…
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    Mayo Clinic Center for Innovation

  • Utilizing Technology to Build a Continuum of Care

    Kate Scheffler
    23 Oct 2014 | 12:47 pm
      Each year, Mayo Clinic’s Transform symposium offers a place for healthcare innovators to reimagine and redesign the current challenges facing healthcare. A keynote speaker at this year’s event, Vaughn Kauffman, discusses the impact of consumerism on the healthcare industry and how health insurers play a central role in controlling expenses and improving quality. Principal at PwC’s Health Industries Advisory Services, Kauffman has served a variety of health insurers and providers focused on information technology and business operations. Recently, his work has revolved around…
  • A Theory on Patient Education

    Matthew Gardner, Mayo Clinic Service Designer
    21 Oct 2014 | 9:11 am
        I have a nurse friend who was asking around for leads to research about, “what motivates patients to participate in patient education?” I had already started to form my own view on that, so instead of looking around for leads to articles that I didn’t know existed, I provided my own answer, founded upon conversations that I have had recently, and in the past, but also upon a recent experience I had following up with patients with diabetes who had been given an opportunity to participate in an education pilot, but who had not taken the chance. So here it is: In my own…
  • Discipline Is The Bridge…

    center_for_innovation
    20 Oct 2014 | 6:35 am
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  • Making Health Addictive

    center_for_innovation
    15 Oct 2014 | 2:20 pm
        Blog Post Written by Kate Scheffler. Bringing design thinking to health care, Mayo Clinic’s annual Transform symposium is a dynamic event focused on redesigning the way that health care is experienced and delivered. Leaders from a wide variety of backgrounds both inside and outside the health care industry convene at the conference and share their ideas on transforming the delivery of health care. Speakers discussed topics ranging from new models of health care delivery to challenges concerning the integration of technology into health, engaging and challenging audience…
  • If These Rooms Could Talk

    center_for_innovation
    14 Oct 2014 | 9:39 am
      Guest Blog Post by 2013 Transform Presenter, Susan Mazer   I keep coming back to the patient experience as being elusive, difficult to nail down, and more difficult to actually make happen and control. Added to that is the role of the physical environment as it informs patients and families about the hospital culture, staff competency; and provides real-time “data” for their prognosis. So, let’s talk about setting the stage. How do you pre-empt opinions and reactions by anticipating the first impression of everyone who comes into the patient room? When we set the stage for a…
 
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    Mayo Clinic News Network » Radio

  • Mayo Clinic Radio: Breast Cancer Awareness

    McCray
    21 Oct 2014 | 7:54 am
    October is Breast Cancer Awareness month, and on the next Mayo Clinic Radio, Saturday, October 25 at 9 a.m. CT, two Mayo Clinic Breast Clinic physicians will be with us to discuss the latest in research and the ongoing efforts to diagnose, treat and prevent breast cancer. Director of the Breast Clinic Karthik Ghosh, M.D., and practice chair of the Medical Oncology Breast Group Tufia Haddad, M.D., will be ready  to answer your questions. Please join us. Myth or Fact: Breast feeding reduces the risk of breast cancer. Follow #MayoClinicRadio and tweet your questions. To listen to the…
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    Audrey Caseltine
    21 Oct 2014 | 5:57 am
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    14 Oct 2014 | 11:42 am
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  • Mayo Clinic Radio: Men’s Health

    McCray
    13 Oct 2014 | 2:23 pm
    Miss the show? Here's the podcast: Mayo Clinic Radio Full Show 10-18-2014 44min mp3 On the next Mayo Clinic Radio, Saturday, October 18 at 9 a.m. CT, the topic is Men's Health. Two physicians from the new Mayo Clinic Men's Health Program in Arizona will be here to discuss endocrine issues like diabetes and thyroid health. Other topics will include low testosterone and how prostate and sexual health relate to cardiovascular health.  Urologist Jason Jameson, M.D., and cardiologist David Simper, M.D., will join us. Hope you do, too. Myth or Fact:  Men experience their own type of menopause.
  • Mayo Clinic Radio: ALS Awareness

    McCray
    6 Oct 2014 | 1:14 pm
    Miss the show? Here's the podcast: Mayo Clinic Radio Full Show 10-11-2014 44min mp3 On the next Mayo Clinic Radio, Saturday, October 11 at 9 a.m. CT, we'll discuss Aamyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) with Anthony Windebank, M.D. Often called Lou Gehrig's disease, ALS is a type of progressive motor neuron disease that typically strikes at middle to later life and causes nerve cells in the spinal cord, brainstem and brain to gradually break down and die. These nerve cells are responsible for muscle function, so eventually ALS can affect the ability to control the muscles needed to move,…
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    Diversity in Education Blog

  • What are we eating?

    Carl Gustafson
    9 Oct 2014 | 5:31 pm
    Contrary to popular belief, Facebook can be good for something every now and then. While wasting precious time on Facebook (shh! don’t tell my PI!), I stumbled across this blog post, by an endocrinologist in California who compared his dining experience at the Googleplex, to his dining experiences at various hospitals. I sure hope Google starts hiring pharmacologists because his blog raved about the cafeteria food in Mountain View. I don’t know about you, but a good salad bar and a name like “Mountain View” is enough to make me want to apply for a position. This article spurred me a…
  • Gender Equality: Women’s Rights are Human Rights

    Andrew M. Harrsion
    1 Oct 2014 | 7:48 pm
    By Wells B. LaRiviere Note: Sex refers to the biological assignment of reproductive anatomy, while gender refers to a spectrum of social and cultural roles associated with sex. This post touches on both, but for the sake of brevity, I will not explore this complex subject further. On the afternoon of September 18th, 2014, Dr. Karen Hedin (Professor, Mayo Clinic Department of Immunology) hosted a discussion entitled “Women in Science: Problems and Brainstorming Solutions,” an important extension of the ongoing discussion of sex equality at Mayo Clinic. The conference room on the 15th floor…
  • The Greatest Taboo: Mental Illness, Society, Science, and Medicine

    Andrew M. Harrsion
    11 Sep 2014 | 10:04 pm
    By Andrew M. Harrison In 1902, Bertrand Russell wrote, “Mathematics, rightly viewed, possesses not only truth, but supreme beauty—a beauty cold and austere, like that of sculpture, without appeal to any part of our weaker nature, without the gorgeous trappings of painting or music, yet sublimely pure, and capable of a stern perfection such as only the greatest art can show.” Beautiful words by one of my heroes and also the pathetic opening to my medical school application essay in the summer of 2009. I did not even get the date correct, but it did not matter then and does not matter…
  • Avoiding a Career as a Perpetual Postdoc

    Clara Castillejobecerra
    4 Sep 2014 | 6:17 am
    As trainees, we are faced with a frustrating reality-- the job market cannot meet the increasing supply of PhDs. We know this and most of us decide to pursue further postdoctoral training in order to become more qualified for the limited positions. Unfortunately, the few years we anticipate for postdoctoral training can extend longer than desired, thereby causing many of us to become stuck in perpetual postdoctoral work. Disillusioned by the process, a portion of us will abandon our initial career goals to settle for less than desired or just leave science altogether. But are some of us…
  • Learning to Listen: Doing Federal Policy from the Bottom-Up in Indian Country

    Andrew M. Harrsion
    24 Aug 2014 | 7:46 pm
    By Ibrahim Garba, MA, JD, LLM In a Philosophy and Medicine course I took in graduate school, the professor spent the semester comparing two models of medicine: the biomedical and the humanistic. Broadly speaking, the biomedical model is based on a view of persons being measurable, empirical entities that can be restored to health through the return of bodily functions and processes to a state of normalcy (statistically defined). In contrast, the humanistic model proposes a dualistic view of personhood, framing humans as being constituted of both “body” and “self”. Consequently,…
 
 
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