Mayo Clinic

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  • Cardiac Rehabilitation Helps Ardis Kyker Improve Her Health, Lose Weight and Avoid Surgery

    Sharing Mayo Clinic
    Hoyt Finnamore
    2 Jul 2015 | 1:25 pm
    Back in 2014, Ardis Kyker was at home going about her daily routine when she experienced tightening in her chest. The pain went away as soon as she sat down to rest, so she proceeded with her day. Later, while pushing a cart at a grocery store, the pain returned with more intensity. So Ardis checked in at the Emergency Department at Mayo Clinic Health System in Red Wing, Minnesota. While test results ruled out a heart attack, the team in the Emergency Department scheduled her for a stress test because of the pain she was feeling on exertion. The stress test explained the chest pain. Ardis…
  • Mayo Psychiatrists Honored For Depression, Bipolar Research

    Advancing the Science
    Bob Nellis
    23 Jun 2015 | 8:27 am
    Two Mayo Clinic psychiatrists have been recognized for their contributions to the study, diagnosis, and treatment of depression and bipolar disorder. Paul Croarkin, D.O., and Mark Frye, M.D., were both presented with the Depression and Bipolar Support Alliance’s (DBSA) highest honors for members of the scientific community: Gerald L. Klerman Awards. The Klerman awards are named for the late Gerald L. Klerman, a psychiatrist and expert on depression. Dr. Paul Croarkin Dr. Paul Croarkin is the Gerald L. Klerman Young Investigator Award recipient. Dr. Croarkin received his medical degree at…
  • Use of Music with People with Dementia: Doing the Obvious

    Mayo Clinic Center for Innovation
    Center for Innovation
    3 Jul 2015 | 9:45 am
        Post written by Susan Mazer, Ph.D.   So much research, and so little traction!  That is what’s been happening with strong data supporting the effective use of music with people with dementia. There is even research that points to the characteristics that music must have to help mitigate anxiety and stress for people with dementia, as well as patients in hospitals.  And, yet, it is still considered an exception to usual and customary care. What does it take to do the obvious? An article in the Journal of Gerontology Nursing showed that music used during mealtimes…
  • Mayo Clinic Radio: IBD and IBS/Treadmill Test/Weight-Loss Maintenance

    Mayo Clinic News Network » Radio
    Richard Dietman
    29 Jun 2015 | 3:00 am
    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) are two very different chronic digestive system conditions that are sometimes confused with one another. On this week's program, gastroenterologists Dr. Sunanda Kane and Dr. Yuri Saito discuss the differences between IBD and IBS, and explain how each is treated. Also on the program, Dr. Thomas Allison, director  of the Mayo Clinic Sports Cardiology Program, talks about a simple treadmill test that can help predict whether you'll live 10 years or more. And psychologist Dr. Karen Grothe has strategies for keeping the…
  • Preconception planning: Is your body ready for pregnancy?

    All Mayo Clinic health information topics
    7 Jul 2015 | 12:00 am
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    Sharing Mayo Clinic

  • Cardiac Rehabilitation Helps Ardis Kyker Improve Her Health, Lose Weight and Avoid Surgery

    Hoyt Finnamore
    2 Jul 2015 | 1:25 pm
    Back in 2014, Ardis Kyker was at home going about her daily routine when she experienced tightening in her chest. The pain went away as soon as she sat down to rest, so she proceeded with her day. Later, while pushing a cart at a grocery store, the pain returned with more intensity. So Ardis checked in at the Emergency Department at Mayo Clinic Health System in Red Wing, Minnesota. While test results ruled out a heart attack, the team in the Emergency Department scheduled her for a stress test because of the pain she was feeling on exertion. The stress test explained the chest pain. Ardis…
  • From Patient to Physician

    Hoyt Finnamore
    26 Jun 2015 | 6:05 am
    Dr. Brandon Lane Phillips' experience as a patient and a student at Mayo Clinic influences his own practice of medicine today As a pediatric cardiology fellow at Mayo Clinic, Dr. Brandon Lane Phillips cared for a number of children from Mongolia who had congenital heart defects. Before they went into surgery, he would take a photo of their hands next to his on a white piece of paper. He would do the same again after surgery and before they returned home. The difference was striking. "In the pictures before heart surgery, you could clearly see a blue cast to their skin. After surgery, the blue…
  • West Nile Put Gloria Johnson on a Ventilator. Rehab Brings Her Back

    Hoyt Finnamore
    24 Jun 2015 | 12:00 pm
    Gloria Johnson’s life changed in the blink of an eye. Gloria and her husband, Floyd, were camping in South Dakota in August 2013, when her body’s temperature skyrocketed to 104.6 degrees, and her body went limp. She went from enjoying her time at a campground to being paralyzed from the neck down. She was diagnosed with West Nile virus, which is transmitted by mosquitoes. Most people infected with West Nile virus experience a slight fever or a mild headache. Gloria was in the minority – less than one percent – of people affected neurologically by the virus. She ended up being admitted…
  • Spina Bifida Won’t Slow Down Ty Wiberg

    Hoyt Finnamore
    12 Jun 2015 | 3:17 pm
    If everyone else can do it, why can’t I? If Ty Wiberg, a 13-year-old from Chippewa Falls, Wisconsin, has one guiding principle in life, that might be the one. The Chippewa Falls Middle School student has undergone 16 surgeries, walks with braces and uses a wheelchair for distance. Ty was born with spina bifida, a spinal cord malformation. He also suffers from hydrocephalus, a buildup of fluid in the brain for which a tube-like shunt drains excess fluid. And he has limited sensation from the knees down, among other issues. Not that any of that is slowing him down. Ty mono-skis, distance…
  • Transplant Change-Up Gives Courtney a Second Chance

    Hoyt Finnamore
    4 Jun 2015 | 11:54 am
    Courtney Kidd is working hard to raise organ donor awareness after a new approach to double-organ transplant saved her life. Born with five congenital heart defects and suffering through several medical complications, Courtney needed both a new heart and a new liver. Previous surgeries at ages 2, 6, 12 and then again at 22, and numerous blood transfusions over the years, had caused her immune system to develop high levels of antibodies that would attack and reject foreign tissues. She was told that her risk of organ rejection was too high if she received a heart and liver transplant in the…
 
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    Advancing the Science

  • Mayo Psychiatrists Honored For Depression, Bipolar Research

    Bob Nellis
    23 Jun 2015 | 8:27 am
    Two Mayo Clinic psychiatrists have been recognized for their contributions to the study, diagnosis, and treatment of depression and bipolar disorder. Paul Croarkin, D.O., and Mark Frye, M.D., were both presented with the Depression and Bipolar Support Alliance’s (DBSA) highest honors for members of the scientific community: Gerald L. Klerman Awards. The Klerman awards are named for the late Gerald L. Klerman, a psychiatrist and expert on depression. Dr. Paul Croarkin Dr. Paul Croarkin is the Gerald L. Klerman Young Investigator Award recipient. Dr. Croarkin received his medical degree at…
  • Delivery Science Summit 2015 – Last Call for Abstracts

    Elizabeth Zimmermann Young
    23 Jun 2015 | 4:00 am
    Delivery Science Summit 2015 invites you to submit your emerging science/late-breaking abstracts. Some recent technical issues affecting the submission tool have now been resolved, and the summit will accept abstracts through June 29. Together we are building the evidence base in health care delivery, and your work is part of that effort. We need your participation (REGISTER NOW). Posters will highlight research accomplishments across the following themes: Enhance Patient Experience Improve Population Health Manage Total Cost of Care Projects that pertain to research and/or practice of health…
  • What is Discovery Square?

    Bob Nellis
    17 Jun 2015 | 7:15 am
    That question is coming up here at BIO 2015 in Philadelphia. People have heard about Destination Medical Center, the long range economic development initiative underway in Rochester, MN. But at the center of the futuristic images on the TV screens here, is the picture of Discovery Square. It's more than an artist's conception says Jamie Rothe, who is representing DMC at this international conference. "It's both a physical location in the middle of Rochester and a virtual location," she explained. "Some of the visioning is still going on and we will have a pretty clear idea at the end of this…
  • Mayo, DMC, Minnesota at BIO 2015

    Bob Nellis
    16 Jun 2015 | 8:21 am
    The Philadelphia Convention Center is awash with devices, large and small molecules, bio-generators and an endless stream of technologies I can’t hope to explain. Over 17,000 people are here to hear about the latest innovations, inventions, discoveries and ideas, but mostly they hope to make deals. Most American states and industrialized countries are here touting their technology strengths. Even some small island nations have booths declaring that they are “the new biotech hub.” BIO 2015 is essentially a trade show, but instead of cars or computers, the commodity is whatever can be…
  • Continuing the Tradition of Collaboration

    Elizabeth Zimmermann Young
    16 Jun 2015 | 6:00 am
    Kern Center connects with Mayo Clinic history On a recent Wednesday evening in Plummer Hall, 14th floor of the Plummer Building in Rochester, Mayo Clinic physicians and scientists from many departments gathered for discussion. Sitting under the portraits of Mayo’s founders and early leaders were present-day physicians and researchers who continue the Mayo Clinic tradition of collaboration. Hosted by the Mayo Clinic Robert D. and Patricia E. Kern Center for the Science of Health Care Delivery, this meeting provided a forum for building stronger relationships between varied specialties in…
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    Mayo Clinic Center for Innovation

  • Use of Music with People with Dementia: Doing the Obvious

    Center for Innovation
    3 Jul 2015 | 9:45 am
        Post written by Susan Mazer, Ph.D.   So much research, and so little traction!  That is what’s been happening with strong data supporting the effective use of music with people with dementia. There is even research that points to the characteristics that music must have to help mitigate anxiety and stress for people with dementia, as well as patients in hospitals.  And, yet, it is still considered an exception to usual and customary care. What does it take to do the obvious? An article in the Journal of Gerontology Nursing showed that music used during mealtimes…
  • 5 Stories to Start Your Weekend

    Center for Innovation
    3 Jul 2015 | 6:30 am
            1. 'Get My Health Data' Campaign Launches ( Press Release ). 2. Do You Really Want Disruptive Innovation ( Innovation Management ). 3. Why Doctors Need to Listen to and Understand the Patient's Perspective ( Healthworks Collective ). 4. RecycleHealth Wants to Donate that Fitbit in Your Sock Drawer ( The Boston Globe ). 5. Medical School Reboot for the 21st Century ( NPR ).    
  • Think Like a Designer!

    Center for Innovation
    2 Jul 2015 | 9:40 am
        Post written by Joyce Lee   I take care of children with type 1 diabetes in my clinic, and in comparison with other chronic diseases, there is an abundance of health data available about my patients. Blood glucose meters and continuous glucose monitoring systems provide anywhere from 4 up to 300+ blood glucose measures a day; insulin is being dosed anywhere from 4 to 12 insulin times a day, and carbohydrate information can be infinite with every meal and snack ingested. Furthermore, at the quarterly medical visits we have with our patients, there are additional measures…
  • 5 Stories to Make Today Awesome

    Center for Innovation
    2 Jul 2015 | 5:50 am
          1. Why Connected Medicine is Becoming Vital to Health Care ( Wall Street Journal ). 2. The Explainer: Disruptive Innovation ( Harvard Business Review ). 3. This Hospital of the Future is Redefining the Patient Experience ( GE ). 4. What's Driving Health Care Innovation ( Bloomberg )? 5. Unpacking the Role Design has in Health Care's Future ( CFI ).      
  • An Evening With the Future of Health

    Center for Innovation
    1 Jul 2015 | 9:45 am
        Post written by Pritpal S Tamber   I was in the Netherlands a few weeks ago and met a small group of people trying to think courageously about the future of health. It was invigorating to see such bravery, often in the face of resistance from 'the system'. The Netherlands has the best health care system in Europe, according to the Euro Health Consumer Index. Its citizens have to take out health insurance. The Dutch government oversees the quality of, and ensures access to, care, but does not directly manage the system. The country spends about 12% of its GDP on health…
 
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    Mayo Clinic News Network » Radio

  • Mayo Clinic Radio: IBD and IBS/Treadmill Test/Weight-Loss Maintenance

    Richard Dietman
    29 Jun 2015 | 3:00 am
    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) are two very different chronic digestive system conditions that are sometimes confused with one another. On this week's program, gastroenterologists Dr. Sunanda Kane and Dr. Yuri Saito discuss the differences between IBD and IBS, and explain how each is treated. Also on the program, Dr. Thomas Allison, director  of the Mayo Clinic Sports Cardiology Program, talks about a simple treadmill test that can help predict whether you'll live 10 years or more. And psychologist Dr. Karen Grothe has strategies for keeping the…
  • Mayo Clinic Radio: Brain Tumors/Rotator Cuff Injury/Fireworks Safety

    Richard Dietman
    22 Jun 2015 | 5:18 am
    According to the National Cancer Institute, more than 23,000 new cases of brain cancer were diagnosed in the U.S. last year. Of those, about one-third were gliomas ... a type of brain cancer that's particularly hard to treat. On this week's program, Dr. Robert Jenkins, a pathologist and specialist in laboratory genetics, explains new research that may lead to more effective treatments for gliomas. And scientist Dr. Richard Vile describes how a teenage girl with brain cancer changed the focus of his research. Also on the program, orthopedic surgeon Dr. John Sperling talks about rotator…
  • Mayo Clinic Radio: Fertility and Conception/Osteomyelitis/Melanoma

    Richard Dietman
    15 Jun 2015 | 3:57 am
    Fertility ... the ability to make a baby ... is affected by a host of factors. From diet and stress ... to age and genetics ... they all play a role in success or failure when trying to conceive. On this week's program, Dr. Jani Jensen, a specialist in reproductive endocrinology and infertility, discusses her new book, Mayo Clinic Guide to Fertility and Conception. Also on the program, cases of osteomyelitis ... an infection of the bone ... are on the rise, especially among older adults. We find out what's behind this increase from orthopedic surgeon Dr. Paul Huddleston. And dermatologist Dr.
  • Mayo Clinic Radio: Mesothelioma/Hypoactive Sexual Desire Disorder/Senior Nutrition

    Richard Dietman
    8 Jun 2015 | 8:08 am
    Malignant mesothelioma, cancer of the lining of the lungs and abdomen, is relatively rare but often fatal. The 5-year survival rate is between just 5 and 10 percent. On this week's program, thoracic surgeon Dr. Dennis Wigle and pulmonary and critical care medicine specialist Dr. Tobias Peikert explain how viruses are being used to treat mesothelioma and increase the odds of survival. Also on the program, Dr. Stephanie Faubion, director of the Mayo Clinic Women's Health Clinic, discusses hypoactive sexual desire disorder in women and the new drug designed to treat HSDD. And geriatrician Dr.
  • Mayo Clinic Radio: Lumps and Bumps/Tick-Borne Diseases/Picnic Planning

    Richard Dietman
    1 Jun 2015 | 5:49 am
    Lumps and bumps are outward signs our bodies use to alert us that something might not be right on the inside. But not all lumps and bumps are signs of illness. Mayo Clinic surgeon Dr. David Farley explains which lumps and bumps signal something serious ... and which ones don't. Also on the program, it's tick season, and parasitologist Dr. Bobbi Pritt explains how to protect against tick-borne diseases. And registered dietitian Katherine Zeratsky has useful suggestions for how to plan a picnic that combines good nutrition and food safety. Myth or Matter-of-Fact: A cyst is a type of lump…
 
 
 
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