Mayo Clinic

  • Most Topular Stories

  • An Unexpected Stop in Lake City Provides Comfort and a Smooth Transition Home

    Sharing Mayo Clinic
    Hoyt Finnamore
    27 Mar 2015 | 8:52 am
    Gail and Bob Boehmer recall driving through Lake City, Minnesota, many times on their way to northern Wisconsin, where they first met. Neither of them ever imagined the town on Lake Pepin would become a home away from home. The Waterloo, Iowa, couple recently spent six weeks in Lake City. It wasn’t something they’d planned. But then life happened. And after three helicopter rides and multiple surgeries at Mayo Clinic, Bob found himself in need of just the kind of healing environment Mayo Clinic Health System in Lake City offers through the Mayo Transitional Care program. The program…
  • Announcing Regular Health Care Delivery Science Column

    Advancing the Science
    Elizabeth Zimmermann Young
    24 Mar 2015 | 8:08 am
    Greetings, Readers of Advancing the Science! You may have noticed an increase in posts from the Mayo Clinic Robert D. and Patricia E. Kern Center for the Science of Health Care Delivery in recent weeks. We plan to expand our reach and share practice-changing science via this new channel. Please let us know what you think of the new content (email the center). In the center we are focused on applying innovative science to evaluate the quality, safety and value of health care globally and improve experiences for patients. Our multidisciplinary teams are working tirelessly to build the evidence…
  • Why We Need Humor in Health Care

    Mayo Clinic Center for Innovation
    Center for Innovation
    30 Mar 2015 | 4:36 pm
        One of our most popular videos from Transform has been from the amazing Patch Adams. Five years later, he is still clowning around the globe with his clown tours, and making children laugh and smile in countless ways. Enjoy his awe inspiring talk after the break!   _______
  • Mayo Clinic Radio: Spring Training/Wearable Fitness Devices/Vertigo

    Mayo Clinic News Network » Radio
    Richard Dietman
    22 Mar 2015 | 8:25 am
    The Major League baseball season is about to begin, and for many of us it signals the start of outdoor fitness activities. To avoid injury, it's a good idea to do some spring training before jumping into your favorite sport. On this week's program, Mayo Clinic sports medicine specialist Dr. Ed Laskowski has tips for getting back in shape. Also on the show, preventive and occupational medicine specialist Dr. Phil Hagen explains how wearable digital fitness devices can enhance your workout. And we learn about vertigo and how it's treated from audiologist Dr. Neil Shepard. Miss the…
  • Becoming a Question Artist

    Diversity in Education Blog
    Carl Gustafson
    19 Mar 2015 | 2:41 pm
    “In re mathematica ars proponendi quaestionem pluris facienda est quam solvendi.” – Georg Cantor Just when you thought Latin was a dead language… If I were to ask you a question, how would you answer it? …Did you just tell yourself, “well, Self, that depends on the type of question!”? Good. You’re awake! Let’s be more specific. Here is the question: What did Georg Cantor just say to the world? Since I assume that you already answered this question, how exactly did you go about answering it? There are possibly thousands or millions of strategies by which to conquer…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Sharing Mayo Clinic

  • An Unexpected Stop in Lake City Provides Comfort and a Smooth Transition Home

    Hoyt Finnamore
    27 Mar 2015 | 8:52 am
    Gail and Bob Boehmer recall driving through Lake City, Minnesota, many times on their way to northern Wisconsin, where they first met. Neither of them ever imagined the town on Lake Pepin would become a home away from home. The Waterloo, Iowa, couple recently spent six weeks in Lake City. It wasn’t something they’d planned. But then life happened. And after three helicopter rides and multiple surgeries at Mayo Clinic, Bob found himself in need of just the kind of healing environment Mayo Clinic Health System in Lake City offers through the Mayo Transitional Care program. The program…
  • From ‘Shock’ to Hope – Young Woman Shares Her Breast Cancer Journey

    Hoyt Finnamore
    23 Mar 2015 | 9:59 am
    In her early 30s and with “a wonderful child, wonderful husband and a great career,” Dawn DeCook-Gibson says the last thing she expected was a breast cancer diagnosis. Following the initial shock of the news, Dawn, from Chandler, Arizona, sought out doctors at Mayo Clinic and was guided through her treatment and recovery by Donald Northfelt, M.D., her oncologist, and Barbara Pockaj, M.D., her surgeon. “I was diagnosed with stage 2b lobular carcinoma breast cancer last year,” she says. “I was in shock … everything just seemed like it was perfect, and then the diagnosis came in.
  • Battling Colon Cancer at an Unexpected Age

    Hoyt Finnamore
    20 Mar 2015 | 12:15 pm
    The majority of people diagnosed with colon cancer are older than 50. Kelly Barnard was just 19 years old when she got an unwelcome Valentine’s Day surprise. Her stomach pain turned out to be something much more serious. Among cancer's many negative qualities is the seemingly indiscriminate way the disease manifests itself. Cancer doesn’t care what your race, gender or ethnicity is. It doesn't care about your profession where you live or your family situation. And it doesn't necessarily care about your age. Just ask Kelly Barnard. Kelly's cancer story began when she was just 19 years…
  • Stopping the Seizures

    Hoyt Finnamore
    13 Mar 2015 | 1:53 pm
    After brain surgery at Mayo Clinic, Xander Torres is a healthy, happy kid "My hand is wiggly." When 4-year-old Xander Torres said these words to his mother, Sarah, she had no idea the long journey they would begin. "To be honest, I didn't think much about it at first," she says. Several weeks went by when Xander's hand was occasionally "wiggly." Then during a stint as ring-bearer in a family wedding, he had what looked to his parents like a seizure. Frightened and confused, they took Xander to several physicians in their hometown of Omaha, Nebraska. Unable to learn what was causing the…
  • This Selfie Brought to You by Colon Cancer Screening

    Hoyt Finnamore
    10 Mar 2015 | 11:36 am
    Twelve years after her diagnosis, Jane Jacobs knows the value of finding and treating colon cancer early and is participating in Fight Colorectal Cancer's #StrongArmSelfie campaign. Jane Jacobs understands the squeamishness some people have as they consider going through tests to check for colon cancer. "No one wants to think about or talk about their colon," she says. "You don't see it. Its job is hardly glamorous. It tends to be part of the body people would rather forget about." But after being diagnosed and successfully treated for early-stage colon cancer at age 40, Jane, who works in…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Advancing the Science

  • Announcing Regular Health Care Delivery Science Column

    Elizabeth Zimmermann Young
    24 Mar 2015 | 8:08 am
    Greetings, Readers of Advancing the Science! You may have noticed an increase in posts from the Mayo Clinic Robert D. and Patricia E. Kern Center for the Science of Health Care Delivery in recent weeks. We plan to expand our reach and share practice-changing science via this new channel. Please let us know what you think of the new content (email the center). In the center we are focused on applying innovative science to evaluate the quality, safety and value of health care globally and improve experiences for patients. Our multidisciplinary teams are working tirelessly to build the evidence…
  • Hope for reversing multiple sclerosis

    Bob Nellis
    20 Mar 2015 | 9:49 am
    Dr. Moses Rodriguez In 1983, when Moses Rodriguez, M.D., established a small research lab to study multiple sclerosis (MS) at Mayo Clinic, he was told that he was wasting his time. Dr. Rodriguez, now an emeritus staff member, was trained as a physician in neurology. Adding basic science research to his portfolio would be impossible, he was told. But Dr. Rodriguez wanted very much to be both a physician and researcher. As a physician he would specialize in identifying and treating neurologic problems, but then as a researcher, he would take those problems back to the lab where he would begin…
  • Would You Get Screened for Cancer if You Could Do It At the Mall Instead of at the Hospital?

    Jon Ebbert, M.D.
    17 Mar 2015 | 10:03 am
    Chronic heartburn can cause esophageal cancer. But people who suffer from heartburn often don't get screened for cancer, and the results can be deadly. Heartburn can lead to a condition called "Barrett's esophagus." Barrett's esophagus is a strong, and only known, risk factor for cancer of the esophagus.   New research conducted in collaboration with the Mayo Clinic Robert D. and Patricia E. Kern Center for the Science of Health Care Delivery shows that an alternate screening technique that does not require sedation is just as effective in identifying Barrett’s esophagus or cancer as…
  • Dr. Edith Perez named to Board of AACR

    Bob Nellis
    13 Mar 2015 | 11:33 am
    Edith Perez, M.D. Mayo Clinic physician and researcher Edith A. Perez, M.D. has been named to the Board of Directors of the American Association for Cancer Research. She is among five new members elected to serve on the AACR board for the 2015-2018 term and four members to serve on the nominating committee for the 2015-2017 term. They will begin their terms at the AACR Annual Meeting 2015, to be held in Philadelphia, April 18-22.  Dr. Perez is an internationally regarded breast cancer specialist and scientist based at Mayo Clinic's campus in Florida. She  is deputy director at large at the…
  • Doubts Put to Rest for Hormone Replacement Therapy

    Jon Ebbert, M.D.
    12 Mar 2015 | 5:31 am
    Doctors used to give their female patients hormone replacement therapy (HRT) after menopause believing that it had positive health benefits. However, data from a large clinical trial cast profound doubt on these benefits. So much so that clinicians were encouraged to only give it to patients for symptoms related to menopause (hot flashes). Many women stopped their HRT. Meanwhile, other women kept taking it, and the question remained. Does it put their life at risk? Investigators working with the Mayo Clinic Robert D. and Patricia E. Kern Center for the Science of Health Care…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Mayo Clinic Center for Innovation

  • Why We Need Humor in Health Care

    Center for Innovation
    30 Mar 2015 | 4:36 pm
        One of our most popular videos from Transform has been from the amazing Patch Adams. Five years later, he is still clowning around the globe with his clown tours, and making children laugh and smile in countless ways. Enjoy his awe inspiring talk after the break!   _______
  • Think Big, Aim High, Act Bold. #txfm

    Center for Innovation
    30 Mar 2015 | 6:12 am
          ____
  • 10 Stories You Might Have Missed This Week

    Center for Innovation
    27 Mar 2015 | 6:15 am
          Engaging and supporting your staff improves the patient experience ( Health Service Journal ). Data Silos: Health care's Silent Shame ( Forbes ). Apple has it's sights on clinical trials ( Washington Post ). Health care systems try to cut costs by aiding the poor and troubled ( New York Times ). When wearable tech saves your life, you won't take it off ( Fast Company ). Department of Health and Human Services launches digital storytelling to increase HIV treatment ( Clinical Innovation + Technology ). Iceland's giant genome project points to the future of medicine ( IEEE…
  • An Inconvenient Truth: How Your Environment Can Improve the Patient Experience

    Center for Innovation
    26 Mar 2015 | 7:13 am
        When the snow starts melting and temperatures turn above freezing here in Minnesota, everyone becomes happier. There's an almost tangible change in everyone's attitude that is powerful. If the changing of the season can have this profound effect on people's well-being, how much of an effect can the environment of a clinical setting have on someone's recovery? This very question was the impetus for what Transform Presenter Susan Mazer, Ph.D., took to create the C.A.R.E. Channel and her Healing Healthcare Systems business. For Dr. Mazer, the environment of the patient's room is…
  • Flipping the Concept of Health Literacy

    Center for Innovation
    25 Mar 2015 | 9:25 am
      Post Written by Joyce Lee, M.D., M.P.H., originally featured on Medium Patient problem or healthcare problem?   Upon the recommendation of colleagues, I have been reading a fantastic book by famed designer, Alan Cooper, titled The Inmates are Running the Asylum. It’s a book about software design, but it’s changing the way that I think about healthcare. Cooper talks about the problems with the usability of software: We industry insiders toss around the term “computer literacy,” assuming that in order to use computers, people must acquire some fundamental level of training.
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Mayo Clinic News Network » Radio

  • Mayo Clinic Radio: Spring Training/Wearable Fitness Devices/Vertigo

    Richard Dietman
    22 Mar 2015 | 8:25 am
    The Major League baseball season is about to begin, and for many of us it signals the start of outdoor fitness activities. To avoid injury, it's a good idea to do some spring training before jumping into your favorite sport. On this week's program, Mayo Clinic sports medicine specialist Dr. Ed Laskowski has tips for getting back in shape. Also on the show, preventive and occupational medicine specialist Dr. Phil Hagen explains how wearable digital fitness devices can enhance your workout. And we learn about vertigo and how it's treated from audiologist Dr. Neil Shepard. Miss the…
  • Mayo Clinic Radio: Colon Cancer Awareness/Brain Injury/Palliative Care

    Richard Dietman
    15 Mar 2015 | 7:42 am
    Colon cancer remains the second-leading cause of cancer death among both men and women in the U.S. On this week's program, we hear about #strongarmselfie, the Twitter campaign to raise awareness and funds for a cure. Gastroenterologist Dr. Paul Limburg explains why the best test for colon cancer is the one you get. Also on the program, physical medicine and rehabilitation specialist Dr. Allen Brown discusses why older adults are as vulnerable as athletes to traumatic brain injury. And we'll have suggestions for choosing palliative care from general internal medicine specialist Dr. Jacob…
  • Mayo Clinic Radio: Alzheimer’s Disease/Meditation

    Richard Dietman
    9 Mar 2015 | 7:04 am
    It's estimated that 5 million Americans age 65 and older may have Alzheimer's disease. And with an aging population on the rise, that number is expected to increase dramatically in the coming years. On this week's program, Dr. Ronald Petersen, director of the Mayo Clinic Alzheimer's Disease Research Center, has the latest on advances in treatment and the search for a cure. Also on the program, Dr. Amit Sood offers helpful tips on how to "unplug" with brief moments of stress-reducing meditation during even the busiest of days. Miss the show?  Here's the podcast:  MayoClinicRadio…
  • Protected: Mayo Clinic Radio – March 7, 2015

    Audrey Caseltine
    6 Mar 2015 | 6:29 pm
    This content is password protected. To view it please enter your password below: Password:
  • Mayo Clinic Radio: Spinal Stenosis/Zebrafish/Recurring Fever

    Richard Dietman
    1 Mar 2015 | 7:03 pm
    Stay active to keep fit. That can be difficult for people with spinal stenosis, a condition that causes serious back pain. On the next Mayo Clinic Radio, orthopedic surgeon Dr. Paul Huddleston explains how spinal stenosis is treated. Also on the program, Dr. Stephen Ekker discusses how the tiny zebrafish is helping to uncover treatments for everything from nicotine dependence to hearing loss. And we'll have the latest on recurring fever in children from Mayo Clinic pediatrician Dr. Thomas Boyce. Miss the program?  Here's the podcast:  Mayo Clinic Radio PODCAST March 7 2015 Myth or…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Diversity in Education Blog

  • Becoming a Question Artist

    Carl Gustafson
    19 Mar 2015 | 2:41 pm
    “In re mathematica ars proponendi quaestionem pluris facienda est quam solvendi.” – Georg Cantor Just when you thought Latin was a dead language… If I were to ask you a question, how would you answer it? …Did you just tell yourself, “well, Self, that depends on the type of question!”? Good. You’re awake! Let’s be more specific. Here is the question: What did Georg Cantor just say to the world? Since I assume that you already answered this question, how exactly did you go about answering it? There are possibly thousands or millions of strategies by which to conquer…
  • The Banality of “That’s Nice”

    Andrew M. Harrsion
    26 Feb 2015 | 7:43 pm
    By Nora E. King I sat in Mayo Clinic’s St. Marys Hospital cafeteria with my clinical team, in that awkward way medical students know too well: the attending physician (“consultant” at Mayo Clinic) buys you a cup of coffee and then proceeds to gossip with his buddies for the next 15 minutes. It’s never clear whether you should chuckle along with the stories or pretend to not listen, absorbed in your notes on the patient list. Unusually, the cafeteria was filled with music. “What’s that noise?” someone said. We glanced around and noticed a poster with sepia photos of famous Black…
  • Training in Research and Parenthood

    Clara Castillejobecerra
    29 Jan 2015 | 8:43 am
    Perhaps you are contemplating becoming a parent in the future. If so, you may be wondering how becoming a parent will affect your career, how you will handle your responsibilities as a researcher and parent, or how you will survive these tough years in graduate school with the addition of children. To answer some of these questions, this blog will offer different perspectives and advice from students who have made the decision to become both scientist and parents. c Fan-Chi Hsu, Ph.D. received her doctoral degree from the immunology track in November 2014. She and her husband, Chien-Chang…
  • Avoiding scientific nostalgia

    Carl Gustafson
    4 Jan 2015 | 8:41 pm
    Hello diversity blog readers and welcome to 2015! Thanks for sticking with us; we hope you’re as excited about the future of the blog as we are. If not, keep reading. Maybe someday we'll serve up the post you've been waiting for. Science moves pretty fast [citation needed]. In fact, it’s very difficult to quantify the rate of progress of science (umm, units?), and it seems that experts disagree on how to actually do this. Regardless, it appears that global scientific research output (units?) increases at a rate of 8-9% per year. Compare this to the rate of increase in global computer…
  • Should dual degree training exist?

    Andrew M. Harrsion
    18 Dec 2014 | 4:50 pm
    By Andrew M. Harrison No, I will not be writing about the illustrious EdD-JD. However, please note these are both largely regarded as “professional” doctoral degrees in the US. Although still less relevant in the US, you should know the difference, as most of the rest of the world draws a clear distinction between a research doctorate and a “first professional degree”. As data interferes with effecting social changes (for better or worse), and blogs are by nature not designed to be lengthy, let’s get this part out of the way first and fast. More Commentaries on the subject of MD-PhD…
 
 
 
Log in