Mayo Clinic

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  • Mystery Solved – Diagnosis Moves Patient from Frustration to Peace of Mind and a Plan

    Sharing Mayo Clinic
    iggeez
    15 Aug 2014 | 1:07 pm
    I want to share my story to possibly help another person and to hopefully help others who are still facing their own health unknowns. I struggled for years with extreme fatigue, major skin problems, muscle weakness, escalating eye issues, and a host of other unexplained symptoms. I moved to Georgia with more and more symptoms. I developed relationships with new doctors and developed new symptoms – seizures and heart-related syncope. I went to see a neurologist, who began to run tests. In the meantime, I had regular quarterly blood panels by my regular physician, who upon reporting to me by…
  • Scientists As Caregivers

    Advancing The Science
    Bob Nellis
    18 Aug 2014 | 7:59 am
    Not long ago I had the pleasure of witnessing one of those not infrequent moments around here, when patients get together with caregivers to say thank you. Patients and their families find different ways of doing this, from cards and letters to homemade gifts as well as hugs and shout outs on social media. And on the receiving end, the physicians and nurses and technicians certainly appreciate it. This situation was slightly different. The physician in charge of the woman’s case held the celebration, a very nice dinner, but of the majority of people that Stacy Erholtz thanked that evening,…
  • Plush Disease Toys Deliver Healthy Education

    Mayo Clinic Center for Innovation
    center_for_innovation
    22 Aug 2014 | 12:33 pm
    Education about health care can show up in many different forms and mediums. So what happens when an innovative ideas comes in the form of plush toys? You get GIANTMicrobes®, a company that produces plush toys of microscopic organisms, including diseases and human biology. Nerdblock.com, an ecommerce subscription box start-up, will ship thousands of playful plush versions of chlamydia, crab louse, gonorrhea and syphilis, in a bid to raise awareness of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) among its worldwide audience. There are about 20 million new cases of sexually transmitted diseases…
  • Mayo Clinic Radio: Women’s Health

    Mayo Clinic News Network » radio
    McCray
    20 Aug 2014 | 12:45 pm
    On the next Mayo Clinic Radio,Saturday, August 23 at 9 a.m. CT,  we’ll discuss a long list of items regarding women’s health with Stephanie Faubion, M.D.  Of course our bodies are constantly changing, but what can be done about the symptoms accompany aging, especially for women?  We’ll touch on hot flashes, night sweats and new options for hormone therapy.  Plus, just what is perimenopause?  Join us! Myth or Fact: Women have smaller bladders than men. Follow #MayoClinicRadio and tweet your questions. To listen to the program on Saturday, click here. Mayo Clinic Radio is…
  • Mouth sores caused by cancer treatment: How to cope

    All Mayo Clinic health information topics
    22 Aug 2014 | 12:00 am
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    Sharing Mayo Clinic

  • Mystery Solved – Diagnosis Moves Patient from Frustration to Peace of Mind and a Plan

    iggeez
    15 Aug 2014 | 1:07 pm
    I want to share my story to possibly help another person and to hopefully help others who are still facing their own health unknowns. I struggled for years with extreme fatigue, major skin problems, muscle weakness, escalating eye issues, and a host of other unexplained symptoms. I moved to Georgia with more and more symptoms. I developed relationships with new doctors and developed new symptoms – seizures and heart-related syncope. I went to see a neurologist, who began to run tests. In the meantime, I had regular quarterly blood panels by my regular physician, who upon reporting to me by…
  • A Kidney Between Friends

    Hoyt Finnamore
    14 Aug 2014 | 2:36 pm
    Todd Goldrick was living the dream. Good job. Loving wife. Two young, healthy kids. Weekends spent playing golf, softball, kayaking, hiking, running or just hanging around home with the family. But that changed suddenly in 2010, when he and his wife simply tried to buy some life insurance. He was just 28. "Mine came back straight out denied," Todd says. "They told me the reasons. There was a whole long list -- high cholesterol, high blood pressure, and a few other things that I don't remember exactly." Before that day, Todd says he'd been to see his doctor in the Minneapolis–Saint Paul area…
  • Leukemia Survivor Volunteers in a Unique Way to Help Fellow Bone Marrow Transplant Recipients

    Paul Scotti
    13 Aug 2014 | 1:01 pm
    Some people who overcome a life-threatening illness feel motivated to give something back to those who helped make their recovery possible. Charlie Willwerth, a 61-year-old leukemia survivor and bone marrow transplant recipient from St. Augustine, Florida, is taking steps to help bring life-saving stems cells to others in need of a bone marrow transplant. Two years out from his bone marrow transplant, and with his leukemia in remission, Charlie recently completed courier training with Be The Match, the world’s largest bone marrow registry, to become a volunteer stem cell courier. His new…
  • In a moment … a poem, and a vision of hope

    Hoyt Finnamore
    4 Aug 2014 | 2:20 pm
    Sometimes the only way to respond to a thing of beauty is to pour your thoughts out onto the page. And that’s what Mayo Clinic patient Jerry O’Donnell, of Waterloo, Iowa, did after being moved, perhaps even changed, by experiencing the beauty of music in the atrium of the Gonda Building on Mayo’s Rochester campus. Over the past year, Jerry has been a regular visitor to Mayo Clinic, after being diagnosed with a rare form of abdominal cancer located in the duodenum. It was a difficult diagnosis. “Over a short period of time, the reality of my health became more weight bearing,” he…
  • A New Approach to a Difficult Cancer Diagnosis

    Hoyt Finnamore
    28 Jul 2014 | 1:19 pm
    At age 39, Tom Peroulas was active and fit. Coaching and playing rugby, biking to work in downtown Chicago, and exercising daily kept him in good shape. So when he started noticing pain in his leg, groin and hip, he thought it was probably related to activity. He tried stretching and yoga. He rested it. He worked with a physical therapist. Nothing helped. After several months of persistent pain, Tom turned to his doctor, who referred him to a specialist in orthopedics. By the time he turned 40, in April 2013, tests revealed the startling reason for his discomfort: an uncommon kind of cancer…
 
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    Advancing The Science

  • Scientists As Caregivers

    Bob Nellis
    18 Aug 2014 | 7:59 am
    Not long ago I had the pleasure of witnessing one of those not infrequent moments around here, when patients get together with caregivers to say thank you. Patients and their families find different ways of doing this, from cards and letters to homemade gifts as well as hugs and shout outs on social media. And on the receiving end, the physicians and nurses and technicians certainly appreciate it. This situation was slightly different. The physician in charge of the woman’s case held the celebration, a very nice dinner, but of the majority of people that Stacy Erholtz thanked that evening,…
  • Dr. Younkin Receives Lifetime Achievement Award

    Bob Nellis
    22 Jul 2014 | 11:10 am
    Presenting some new Alzheimer's discoveries wasn't the only high point for Mayo Clinic researchers in Copenhagen recently at the Alzheimer's Association International Conference. On July 14 Steven Younkin, M.D., Ph.D., was awarded the Khalid Iqbal Lifetime Achievement Award for his years of research on the disease. Dr. Younkin is Professor of Neuroscience at Mayo Clinic’s campus in Jacksonville, Florida. Before being recruited to Mayo in 1995, he was professor of Pharmacology and Pathology at Case Western Reserve University. Then he began research focused on the role of the amyloid…
  • Using Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis in Patient Care

    Bob Nellis
    10 Jul 2014 | 6:48 am
      M. Hassan Murad, M.D. A team of international experts led by a Mayo Clinic researcher has published in the Journal of the American Medical Association a guide for clinicians who are interested in using systematic reviews and meta-analysis in clinical decision making. This article is the latest in the well-known series of users’ guides to the medical literature that JAMA started publishing in the mid 1990s and is highly sought after by clinicians who want to learn and practice evidence based medicine. “When searching for evidence to answer a clinical question, it’s better to seek…
  • Mayo’s 22 in “Highly Cited Researchers”

    Bob Nellis
    30 Jun 2014 | 10:28 am
    One of the factors in determining the impact a researcher has in the world of science is the number of times that papers by that individual are cited in other peer-reviewed articles. The assumption is that if a discovery is significant, more researchers will use it as a basis for advancing their own research and therefore will be compelled to reference it. Highly Cited Researchers is a compilation of such top researchers -- published  by Thomson Reuters -- across the breadth of research, including physical and life sciences, mathematics and engineering. The count is divided up into groups…
  • Medical Genomics is an increasing part of the biosciences

    Bob Nellis
    24 Jun 2014 | 2:58 pm
    Dr. Eric Wieben, Mayo's Center for Individualized Medicine and Jenn Pettit, State of Minnesota, discuss clinomics at BIO 2014. It was only a decade ago that people were asking us how to pronounce "genomics."  I kid you not. Media had questioned the usefulness of the human genome without asking the right questions of the right organizations. Today the application of a the wide-ranging benefits of genomic knowledge is occupying increasing numbers of institutions around the world. Mayo Clinic has long been a pioneer in pharmacogenomics (choosing the right drug, at the right dose, for the right…
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    Mayo Clinic Center for Innovation

  • Plush Disease Toys Deliver Healthy Education

    center_for_innovation
    22 Aug 2014 | 12:33 pm
    Education about health care can show up in many different forms and mediums. So what happens when an innovative ideas comes in the form of plush toys? You get GIANTMicrobes®, a company that produces plush toys of microscopic organisms, including diseases and human biology. Nerdblock.com, an ecommerce subscription box start-up, will ship thousands of playful plush versions of chlamydia, crab louse, gonorrhea and syphilis, in a bid to raise awareness of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) among its worldwide audience. There are about 20 million new cases of sexually transmitted diseases…
  • Transforming Healthcare Through Urban Farming

    center_for_innovation
    21 Aug 2014 | 6:45 pm
      Guest Blog Post by Nolan Meyer. The upcoming Transform symposium will be an extravaganza of innovation you simply cannot miss if you are interested in innovation and design solutions that transform healthcare for both the patient and the provider. We have invited innovators and thought leaders from a wide range of industries to inspire you and give us all actionable ways to start transforming health care today. What makes Transform unique is that the speakers include physicians, scientists, designers, and innovators, who are leaders in their fields, which may not be directly…
  • Telling the Stories of Innovation

    center_for_innovation
    19 Aug 2014 | 9:20 am
      Guest Blog Post Written by: Nolan Meyer  The Mayo Clinic’s Transform symposium bring the brightest minds to Mayo Clinic to relay what is being done to improve the state of medicine. In 2010, Jesse Dylan, noted film-maker, founder and CEO of Wondros, and son of Bob Dylan, spoke at Transform about how he works to broadcast the stories of those who have trouble distributing a message. As a multimedia guru, Dylan has a unique skillset to do so. His talk began with a sampling of the film work he and his team had done, featuring Bill Clinton, Oprah Winfrey, Michelle Obama, and Matthew…
  • Connecting The Dots

    center_for_innovation
    18 Aug 2014 | 7:49 am
        One of the greatest assets to innovation is to have a diverse group of individuals, interests, backgrounds and education, to bring new and original ideas to the table. You can often be surprised with the connections you discover that are shared across multiple industries that might not have any overlap. Or the similar obstacles you share. We spent this last weekend at the We #MakeHealth Fest at the University of Michigan, and discovered some great ideas for Health Care through the lens of the Maker community there. It was fascinating, and helped to spark new ideas, and…
  • Solving “The American Health Care Paradox” at Transform

    center_for_innovation
    14 Aug 2014 | 9:23 am
      Guest Post Written by: Lada Bogenschutz   Imagine a place where people can come together to find inspiration and innovative solutions to prominent problems in the health care world. Every year at Mayo Clinic Center for Innovation’s Transform symposium, this place becomes a reality. During this year’s symposium, nearly 30 different ambitious and enthusiastic speakers will teach, challenge, and inspire their audience. Audience members come with a promise of not only insightful information, but with the ability to create meaningful connections with those who share similar…
 
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    Mayo Clinic News Network » radio

  • Mayo Clinic Radio: Women’s Health

    McCray
    20 Aug 2014 | 12:45 pm
    On the next Mayo Clinic Radio,Saturday, August 23 at 9 a.m. CT,  we’ll discuss a long list of items regarding women’s health with Stephanie Faubion, M.D.  Of course our bodies are constantly changing, but what can be done about the symptoms accompany aging, especially for women?  We’ll touch on hot flashes, night sweats and new options for hormone therapy.  Plus, just what is perimenopause?  Join us! Myth or Fact: Women have smaller bladders than men. Follow #MayoClinicRadio and tweet your questions. To listen to the program on Saturday, click here. Mayo Clinic Radio is…
  • Protected: Downloads for week of 8-18-2014

    Audrey Caseltine
    18 Aug 2014 | 5:35 am
    This content is password protected. To view it please enter your password below: Password:
  • Mayo Clinic Radio: Social Media and Medicine

    McCray
    11 Aug 2014 | 2:22 pm
    Miss the show? Here is the podcast! Mayo Clinic Radio Full Show 8-16-2014 44min mp3 Our next Mayo Clinic Radio program, Saturday, August 16 at 9 a.m. CT, will highlight the influence and power of social media in health care.  Medical director for the Mayo Clinic Center for Social Media, Farris Timimi, M.D., will join us to discuss the impact of social networks on health care. Hope you'll tune in! Myth or Fact:  The main reason many physicians and hospitals give for not participating in social media is they have legal concerns. Follow #MayoClinicRadio and tweet your questions. To listen…
  • Protected: Downloads for week of 8-11-2014

    Audrey Caseltine
    11 Aug 2014 | 5:25 am
    This content is password protected. To view it please enter your password below: Password:
  • Mayo Clinic Radio: Kidney Stones

    McCray
    5 Aug 2014 | 7:28 am
    Miss the show? Here is the podcast! Mayo Clinic Radio Full Show 8-9-14 Want to find out more on Ebola? Dr Pritish Tosh called in: Dr Tosh on Ebola 8-9-14 Do you know you're at greater risk to develop kidney stones during the month of August?  On the next Mayo Clinic Radio show, Saturday, August 9 at 9 a.m. CT, we'll discuss why kidney stones are more prevalent during the summer.  We’ll also talk about why kidney stones develop, what to do if you have one and how to prevent kidney stones in the first place.  Our experts guests are nephrologist Ivan Porter, M.D., and urology…
 
 
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