Mayo Clinic

  • Most Topular Stories

  • Physician Experiences the Mayo “Patient Experience” After Double Lung Transplant

    Sharing Mayo Clinic
    Paul Scotti
    25 Aug 2014 | 9:01 am
    When a doctor suddenly becomes the patient with a life-threatening illness, Mayo Clinic’s commitment to high-quality medical care that puts the needs of the patient first takes on fresh perspective, especially as it relates to the principle of compassionate care, which is a hallmark of Mayo Clinic. Such was the case when Joseph J. Tepas III, M.D., a 68-year-old pediatric surgeon in Jacksonville, Florida, learned that the wheezing and shortness of breath he was experiencing turned out to be idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, a potentially life-threatening disease that occurs from…
  • Michael Sarr, M.D. Honored by College of Surgeons

    Advancing The Science
    Bob Nellis
    26 Aug 2014 | 1:16 pm
    Michael Sarr, M.D., surgeon and scientist Mayo Clinic gastroenterologic surgeon and scientist Michael Sarr, M.D., is being honored by the American College of Surgeons for his research contributions, surgical expertise and mentorship of the next generation of surgical leaders. The ACS Committee for the Forum on Fundamental Surgical Problems has dedicated the new volume of the Surgical Forum to Dr. Sarr in recognition of his contributions to the surgical profession. Dr. Sarr’s research has included work on gut transplants and pancreatic and bariatric diseases. He has published more than 500…
  • The Experience Trap: The Power of Not Knowing

    Mayo Clinic Center for Innovation
    center_for_innovation
    28 Aug 2014 | 9:16 am
        Guest Blog Post By Transform 2013 Presenter, Susan Mazer   When I first heard about the experience trap, I seriously did not get it. I was struggling to use my experience to solve problems that did not exist even a decade ago. It wasn't working. Even being a good student didn't help when I went back to earn a Ph.D. a few years ago. I needed to break the paradigm in which I saw the world so a new one could form. Creative new solutions do not come from experience. They come from the wanderlust of curiosity mixed together with skills that can be used in new ways, and a…
  • Protected: Downloads for week of 8-25-2014

    Mayo Clinic News Network » radio
    Joel Streed
    25 Aug 2014 | 2:13 pm
    This content is password protected. To view it please enter your password below: Password:
  • Learning to Listen: Doing Federal Policy from the Bottom-Up in Indian Country

    Diversity in Education Blog
    Andrew M. Harrsion
    24 Aug 2014 | 7:46 pm
    By Ibrahim Garba, MA, JD, LLM In a Philosophy and Medicine course I took in graduate school, the professor spent the semester comparing two models of medicine: the biomedical and the humanistic. Broadly speaking, the biomedical model is based on a view of persons being measurable, empirical entities that can be restored to health through the return of bodily functions and processes to a state of normalcy (statistically defined). In contrast, the humanistic model proposes a dualistic view of personhood, framing humans as being constituted of both “body” and “self”. Consequently,…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Sharing Mayo Clinic

  • Physician Experiences the Mayo “Patient Experience” After Double Lung Transplant

    Paul Scotti
    25 Aug 2014 | 9:01 am
    When a doctor suddenly becomes the patient with a life-threatening illness, Mayo Clinic’s commitment to high-quality medical care that puts the needs of the patient first takes on fresh perspective, especially as it relates to the principle of compassionate care, which is a hallmark of Mayo Clinic. Such was the case when Joseph J. Tepas III, M.D., a 68-year-old pediatric surgeon in Jacksonville, Florida, learned that the wheezing and shortness of breath he was experiencing turned out to be idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, a potentially life-threatening disease that occurs from…
  • Mystery Solved – Diagnosis Moves Patient from Frustration to Peace of Mind and a Plan

    iggeez
    15 Aug 2014 | 1:07 pm
    I want to share my story to possibly help another person and to hopefully help others who are still facing their own health unknowns. I struggled for years with extreme fatigue, major skin problems, muscle weakness, escalating eye issues, and a host of other unexplained symptoms. I moved to Georgia with more and more symptoms. I developed relationships with new doctors and developed new symptoms – seizures and heart-related syncope. I went to see a neurologist, who began to run tests. In the meantime, I had regular quarterly blood panels by my regular physician, who upon reporting to me by…
  • A Kidney Between Friends

    Hoyt Finnamore
    14 Aug 2014 | 2:36 pm
    Todd Goldrick was living the dream. Good job. Loving wife. Two young, healthy kids. Weekends spent playing golf, softball, kayaking, hiking, running or just hanging around home with the family. But that changed suddenly in 2010, when he and his wife simply tried to buy some life insurance. He was just 28. "Mine came back straight out denied," Todd says. "They told me the reasons. There was a whole long list -- high cholesterol, high blood pressure, and a few other things that I don't remember exactly." Before that day, Todd says he'd been to see his doctor in the Minneapolis–Saint Paul area…
  • Leukemia Survivor Volunteers in a Unique Way to Help Fellow Bone Marrow Transplant Recipients

    Paul Scotti
    13 Aug 2014 | 1:01 pm
    Some people who overcome a life-threatening illness feel motivated to give something back to those who helped make their recovery possible. Charlie Willwerth, a 61-year-old leukemia survivor and bone marrow transplant recipient from St. Augustine, Florida, is taking steps to help bring life-saving stems cells to others in need of a bone marrow transplant. Two years out from his bone marrow transplant, and with his leukemia in remission, Charlie recently completed courier training with Be The Match, the world’s largest bone marrow registry, to become a volunteer stem cell courier. His new…
  • In a moment … a poem, and a vision of hope

    Hoyt Finnamore
    4 Aug 2014 | 2:20 pm
    Sometimes the only way to respond to a thing of beauty is to pour your thoughts out onto the page. And that’s what Mayo Clinic patient Jerry O’Donnell, of Waterloo, Iowa, did after being moved, perhaps even changed, by experiencing the beauty of music in the atrium of the Gonda Building on Mayo’s Rochester campus. Over the past year, Jerry has been a regular visitor to Mayo Clinic, after being diagnosed with a rare form of abdominal cancer located in the duodenum. It was a difficult diagnosis. “Over a short period of time, the reality of my health became more weight bearing,” he…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Advancing The Science

  • Michael Sarr, M.D. Honored by College of Surgeons

    Bob Nellis
    26 Aug 2014 | 1:16 pm
    Michael Sarr, M.D., surgeon and scientist Mayo Clinic gastroenterologic surgeon and scientist Michael Sarr, M.D., is being honored by the American College of Surgeons for his research contributions, surgical expertise and mentorship of the next generation of surgical leaders. The ACS Committee for the Forum on Fundamental Surgical Problems has dedicated the new volume of the Surgical Forum to Dr. Sarr in recognition of his contributions to the surgical profession. Dr. Sarr’s research has included work on gut transplants and pancreatic and bariatric diseases. He has published more than 500…
  • Scientists As Caregivers

    Bob Nellis
    18 Aug 2014 | 7:59 am
    Not long ago I had the pleasure of witnessing one of those not infrequent moments around here, when patients get together with caregivers to say thank you. Patients and their families find different ways of doing this, from cards and letters to homemade gifts as well as hugs and shout outs on social media. And on the receiving end, the physicians and nurses and technicians certainly appreciate it. This situation was slightly different. The physician in charge of the woman’s case held the celebration, a very nice dinner, but of the majority of people that Stacy Erholtz thanked that evening,…
  • Dr. Younkin Receives Lifetime Achievement Award

    Bob Nellis
    22 Jul 2014 | 11:10 am
    Presenting some new Alzheimer's discoveries wasn't the only high point for Mayo Clinic researchers in Copenhagen recently at the Alzheimer's Association International Conference. On July 14 Steven Younkin, M.D., Ph.D., was awarded the Khalid Iqbal Lifetime Achievement Award for his years of research on the disease. Dr. Younkin is Professor of Neuroscience at Mayo Clinic’s campus in Jacksonville, Florida. Before being recruited to Mayo in 1995, he was professor of Pharmacology and Pathology at Case Western Reserve University. Then he began research focused on the role of the amyloid…
  • Using Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis in Patient Care

    Bob Nellis
    10 Jul 2014 | 6:48 am
      M. Hassan Murad, M.D. A team of international experts led by a Mayo Clinic researcher has published in the Journal of the American Medical Association a guide for clinicians who are interested in using systematic reviews and meta-analysis in clinical decision making. This article is the latest in the well-known series of users’ guides to the medical literature that JAMA started publishing in the mid 1990s and is highly sought after by clinicians who want to learn and practice evidence based medicine. “When searching for evidence to answer a clinical question, it’s better to seek…
  • Mayo’s 22 in “Highly Cited Researchers”

    Bob Nellis
    30 Jun 2014 | 10:28 am
    One of the factors in determining the impact a researcher has in the world of science is the number of times that papers by that individual are cited in other peer-reviewed articles. The assumption is that if a discovery is significant, more researchers will use it as a basis for advancing their own research and therefore will be compelled to reference it. Highly Cited Researchers is a compilation of such top researchers -- published  by Thomson Reuters -- across the breadth of research, including physical and life sciences, mathematics and engineering. The count is divided up into groups…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Mayo Clinic Center for Innovation

  • The Experience Trap: The Power of Not Knowing

    center_for_innovation
    28 Aug 2014 | 9:16 am
        Guest Blog Post By Transform 2013 Presenter, Susan Mazer   When I first heard about the experience trap, I seriously did not get it. I was struggling to use my experience to solve problems that did not exist even a decade ago. It wasn't working. Even being a good student didn't help when I went back to earn a Ph.D. a few years ago. I needed to break the paradigm in which I saw the world so a new one could form. Creative new solutions do not come from experience. They come from the wanderlust of curiosity mixed together with skills that can be used in new ways, and a…
  • My Motivation For Designing For Health

    mkcawcutt
    26 Aug 2014 | 9:05 am
          Blog Post Written By Center for Innovation Designer, Michael Cawcutt   I recently read an article pushed to me via a sidebar email conversation. Cole Peters, the author of an article titled, "Design Culture is a Frozen..." Peters gives his perspective on how the design community spend's the majority of it's time making designs that seems to pad their CV's rather then trying to solve real world issues. This made me reflect on my own experiences as a designer while over the last few years I've transitioned from 'agency life' to designing for healthcare. Healthcare?
  • Having The Mind Of A Child

    center_for_innovation
    25 Aug 2014 | 1:43 pm
        How many of us spent hours doodling in MS Paint just to fill the spaces up in various colors? Just the joy of scribbling around and every new piece was another work of art. There is something we can all learn from the mind of a child, and as innovators, we can work hard to bring back that type of open-minded, unlearned, and truly creative mindset back. Take some time this week to doodle. Draw. Sketch. You don't have to act like a child to think like one. That's the beauty of innovation! Have a fantastic week, and we hope to see you at Transform in a couple of weeks!  …
  • Plush Disease Toys Deliver Healthy Education

    center_for_innovation
    22 Aug 2014 | 12:33 pm
    Education about health care can show up in many different forms and mediums. So what happens when an innovative ideas comes in the form of plush toys? You get GIANTMicrobes®, a company that produces plush toys of microscopic organisms, including diseases and human biology. Nerdblock.com, an ecommerce subscription box start-up, will ship thousands of playful plush versions of chlamydia, crab louse, gonorrhea and syphilis, in a bid to raise awareness of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) among its worldwide audience. There are about 20 million new cases of sexually transmitted diseases…
  • Transforming Healthcare Through Urban Farming

    center_for_innovation
    21 Aug 2014 | 6:45 pm
      Guest Blog Post by Nolan Meyer. The upcoming Transform symposium will be an extravaganza of innovation you simply cannot miss if you are interested in innovation and design solutions that transform healthcare for both the patient and the provider. We have invited innovators and thought leaders from a wide range of industries to inspire you and give us all actionable ways to start transforming health care today. What makes Transform unique is that the speakers include physicians, scientists, designers, and innovators, who are leaders in their fields, which may not be directly…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Mayo Clinic News Network » radio

  • Protected: Downloads for week of 8-25-2014

    Joel Streed
    25 Aug 2014 | 2:13 pm
    This content is password protected. To view it please enter your password below: Password:
  • Mayo Clinic Radio: Back-To-School

    McCray
    25 Aug 2014 | 3:00 am
    For many students this is back-to-school time!  On the next Mayo Clinic Radio, Saturday, August 30 at 9 a.m. CT, four physicians will join us and share important information related to sending your student back to class.  Noelle Larson, M.D., will discuss scoliosis and finding the correct sized backpack.  Dawn Davis, M.D., will talk about acne, warts, skin rashes and lice. Robert Jacobson, M.D., will give us the latest information on immunizations for students from preschool to college. Brian Mohney, M.D., will discuss eye exams, eyestrain and overall eye health for students.  Join us!
  • Mayo Clinic Radio: Women’s Health

    McCray
    20 Aug 2014 | 12:45 pm
    Miss the show? Here is the podcast! Mayo Clinic Radio Full Show 8-23-2014 On the next Mayo Clinic Radio,Saturday, August 23 at 9 a.m. CT,  we’ll discuss a long list of items regarding women’s health with Stephanie Faubion, M.D.  Of course our bodies are constantly changing, but what can be done about the symptoms accompany aging, especially for women?  We’ll touch on hot flashes, night sweats and new options for hormone therapy.  Plus, just what is perimenopause?  Join us! Myth or Fact: Women have smaller bladders than men. Follow #MayoClinicRadio and tweet your questions. To…
  • Protected: Downloads for week of 8-18-2014

    Audrey Caseltine
    18 Aug 2014 | 5:35 am
    This content is password protected. To view it please enter your password below: Password:
  • Mayo Clinic Radio: Social Media and Medicine

    McCray
    11 Aug 2014 | 2:22 pm
    Miss the show? Here is the podcast! Mayo Clinic Radio Full Show 8-16-2014 44min mp3 Our next Mayo Clinic Radio program, Saturday, August 16 at 9 a.m. CT, will highlight the influence and power of social media in health care.  Medical director for the Mayo Clinic Center for Social Media, Farris Timimi, M.D., will join us to discuss the impact of social networks on health care. Hope you'll tune in! Myth or Fact:  The main reason many physicians and hospitals give for not participating in social media is they have legal concerns. Follow #MayoClinicRadio and tweet your questions. To listen…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Diversity in Education Blog

  • Learning to Listen: Doing Federal Policy from the Bottom-Up in Indian Country

    Andrew M. Harrsion
    24 Aug 2014 | 7:46 pm
    By Ibrahim Garba, MA, JD, LLM In a Philosophy and Medicine course I took in graduate school, the professor spent the semester comparing two models of medicine: the biomedical and the humanistic. Broadly speaking, the biomedical model is based on a view of persons being measurable, empirical entities that can be restored to health through the return of bodily functions and processes to a state of normalcy (statistically defined). In contrast, the humanistic model proposes a dualistic view of personhood, framing humans as being constituted of both “body” and “self”. Consequently,…
  • Lessons from My First Year in Graduate School

    Crystal Mendoza
    10 Jul 2014 | 3:51 pm
    I would like to thank my fellow Diversity Blog editors for their helpful advice and input for this blog post. As summer begins, my first year of graduate school comes to an end. The fact that my first year of graduate school has come to a close brings mixed feelings. I have come a bit further than I was at this same time last year, and thankfully, have learned a few things. In honor of the incoming graduate school class, I have decided to dedicate this post to them to hopefully offer some helpful advice on first-year experiences. The most important aspect of a PhD is the mentor and lab in…
  • Why aren’t more white males a part of the Lean In discussion at Mayo Clinic?

    Andrew M. Harrsion
    29 Jun 2014 | 5:36 pm
    By Rielyn R. Campbell I think Jackson Katz said it best in his Ted talk from November 2012, “A lot of men hear the term “women’s issues” and we tend to tune it out, and we think, “Hey, I’m a guy. That’s for girls.” Or “That’s for the women.” And “a lot of men literally don’t get beyond the first sentence as a result.” I hope if you are a man reading this, you get past the first sentence. On June 19, 2014, I attended the Lean In session (link through Mayo Clinic intranet only), hosted by Mayo Clinic’s Office of Diversity and Inclusion and several Mayo Employee…
  • DREAMing a Career in Science (Undocumented Students’ Pursuit of Science Careers)

    Clara Castillejobecerra
    5 Jun 2014 | 1:42 pm
    On June 15, 2012, the Obama administration announced the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program, which provides deportation relief for a period of two years to qualified undocumented youth who came to the United States as children. While deferred action does not confer lawful status in the United States, it is a renewable program that can provide employment authorization to DACA recipients. Since its announcement, more than half a million youth have applied to deferred action becoming a successful first step into a more permanent immigration reform. Modified from Educators for…
  • This is your mind on grad school: The state of graduate student mental health at UC Berkeley

    Carl Gustafson
    29 May 2014 | 12:06 pm
    Editor’s note: This article was first published in the Spring 2014 edition of the Berkeley Science Review. It has been re-posted to the Mayo Clinic Diversity in Education blog with the direct, written consent of the original authors. You may view the original article here. Featured image: In a 2012 survey of UC Berkeley graduate students, nearly half of respondents reported frequently feeling overwhelmed, exhausted, sad, hopeless, or depressed. credit: concept: Holly Williams; design: tagxedo.com; source for words: csf/asuc/ga 2012 graduate student survey and uhs.berkeley.edu This is your…
 
 
Log in