Mayo Clinic

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  • Patient’s Cancer Journey Inspires Hope and a New Career Path

    Sharing Mayo Clinic
    Hoyt Finnamore
    19 May 2015 | 4:25 am
    Kristen Yukness knew what her doctor was going to say next. After a finding of bilateral deep vein thrombosis after a routine flight, Kristen had a strong feeling – based on her family history – that her condition had been caused by an underlying form of cancer.  She was right. She learned that her venous issues were due to underlying endocervical cancer. Even though she essentially expected to hear the words, "You have cancer," she says they still caught her off guard. "Even with having dealt with the loss of my parents and several family members to the disease, as well as the…
  • Precision Medicine Key in Treating Bipolar Disorder

    Advancing the Science
    Bob Nellis
    20 May 2015 | 9:09 am
    The title is the key message of Mark Frye, M.D,, head of Mayo Clinic's department of psychiatry and psychology today to a group of 20 top medical journalists in Rochester, MN. Just in this morning from the national psychiatry conference in Toronto, Dr. Frye told fellows from the National Press Club Foundation how precision medicine testing can alert physicians as to the appropriate medication for someone with bipolar disorder and also serve as a diagnostic tool. He also outline how Mayo's Bipolar Biobank is helping in research on new treatments for bipolar disorder. He told the reporters…
  • In Memory

    Mayo Clinic Center for Innovation
    Center for Innovation
    25 May 2015 | 7:33 am
            In memory of those who have died in service.   _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________            
  • Mayo Clinic Radio: Osteoporosis/Teeth Whiteners/Food Allergies and Asthma

    Mayo Clinic News Network » Radio
    Richard Dietman
    18 May 2015 | 4:42 am
    As we age, our bones may lose mass and become brittle. These are the signs and symptoms of osteoporosis. According to the National Osteoporosis Foundation, osteoporosis is responsible for 2 million broken bones each year in the U.S. Mayo Clinic endocrinologist Dr. Bart Clarke discusses osteoporosis and how to reduce its impact on your health. Also on the program, we explore the world of teeth whiteners ... what works and what doesn't ... with Mayo Clinic dentist Dr. Phillip Sheridan. And pediatric allergy expert Dr. Martha Hartz will join us to discuss food allergies and asthma in children.
  • Believe it or not…

    Diversity in Education Blog
    Andrew M. Harrsion
    13 May 2015 | 2:46 am
    By Dr. Jim Maher How can Mayo Clinic best honor the axis of diversity that might be called "faith," "belief," "unbelief," or "religion" and what leadership can be shown within Mayo Clinic's academic environment (the Mayo Clinic College of Medicine)? These were some of the questions that motivated a fascinating lunch session on May 11, 2015, organized by the College of Medicine Office for Diversity, and featuring a delightful panel representing a sampling of four faith traditions different from the nominal Christianity that typified 78% of Americans in 2010. The premise of the discussion…
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    Sharing Mayo Clinic

  • Patient’s Cancer Journey Inspires Hope and a New Career Path

    Hoyt Finnamore
    19 May 2015 | 4:25 am
    Kristen Yukness knew what her doctor was going to say next. After a finding of bilateral deep vein thrombosis after a routine flight, Kristen had a strong feeling – based on her family history – that her condition had been caused by an underlying form of cancer.  She was right. She learned that her venous issues were due to underlying endocervical cancer. Even though she essentially expected to hear the words, "You have cancer," she says they still caught her off guard. "Even with having dealt with the loss of my parents and several family members to the disease, as well as the…
  • Brain Hemorrhage Can’t Keep Cyclist From Pedaling On

    Cynthia (Cindy) Weiss
    11 May 2015 | 11:44 am
    At age 42, Donnie DeWitt was the picture of health. A former Marine, he loved to run, surf and was an avid cyclist. But three years ago, while on a bike ride near his home in St. Augustine, Florida, Donnie collapsed. He’d suffered a massive brain hemorrhage that led to a stroke. He was brought to Mayo Clinic’s Comprehensive Stroke Center in Jacksonville, where physicians said the damage was so extensive that Donnie had less than a five percent chance of survival. “We didn’t know if he was going to live, what the outcome would be,” says Belinda, Donnie’s wife. Despite the grim…
  • Tracking Down an Elusive Answer

    Hoyt Finnamore
    8 May 2015 | 2:04 pm
    Plagued by persistent symptoms with no definitive cause, Scott Borden turned to Mayo Clinic to help solve a baffling medical condition that was interfering with his life. In February 2015, Scott Borden boarded a plane in sunny Palm Beach, Florida, and flew into wintertime in Rochester, Minnesota. His trek north, in the opposite direction of most midwinter travelers, was born of frustration and determination. For about a year, Scott had been battling a medical condition characterized by high blood pressure and low potassium levels. Although his doctors suspected an adrenal gland disorder, no…
  • Proton Beam Therapy Gives Young Girl Good Prognosis Despite (Frightening) Diagnosis

    Hoyt Finnamore
    6 May 2015 | 12:34 pm
    It's one thing to teach compassionate communication. It's another thing altogether to be on the receiving end of, "Your daughter has cancer." Learn how proton beam therapy gave Sherry Chesak, Ph.D., and her family hope.  Sherry Chesak, Ph.D., is a program director in Education and Professional Development at Mayo Clinic's Rochester campus, and has worked with doctors as they learn how to communicate compassionately with patients. That includes practices sessions that involve delivering bad news, such as, "You have cancer" or "Your mother's condition isn't curable." When Sherry and her…
  • Young Stroke Survivor Raises Awareness and Educates

    Cynthia (Cindy) Weiss
    4 May 2015 | 3:00 am
    Young stroke survivor Amy Edmunds and David Miller, M.D., director of the Comprehensive Stroke Center at Mayo Clinic's Florida campus. Editor's Note: This guest post is written by Amy Edmunds, founder of YoungStroke. In 2002, I was a daily commuter to Capitol Hill who worked in sales management. Never did I think I would someday return to testify as a patient advocate at Congressional hearings on behalf of young stroke survivors. But then again, never did I expect to be a stroke survivor at age 45. On Jan. 11, 2002, with no identified risk factors and no family history, I had an ischemic…
 
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    Advancing the Science

  • Precision Medicine Key in Treating Bipolar Disorder

    Bob Nellis
    20 May 2015 | 9:09 am
    The title is the key message of Mark Frye, M.D,, head of Mayo Clinic's department of psychiatry and psychology today to a group of 20 top medical journalists in Rochester, MN. Just in this morning from the national psychiatry conference in Toronto, Dr. Frye told fellows from the National Press Club Foundation how precision medicine testing can alert physicians as to the appropriate medication for someone with bipolar disorder and also serve as a diagnostic tool. He also outline how Mayo's Bipolar Biobank is helping in research on new treatments for bipolar disorder. He told the reporters…
  • Single Biggest Concern: A Palliative Approach

    Elizabeth Zimmermann Young
    19 May 2015 | 6:00 am
    For people living with serious illness, both patients and care providers, identifying the single biggest concern can be a difficult task.  There are so many concerns – from “Who will help me if I am too weak to care for myself?” to “How can we treat my nausea and pain?”  When interrupted by a serious illness, life often takes on many new challenges and can certainly create many new fears.   In an effort to understand our patients’ most pressing concerns, we now ask them to tell us about their “single biggest concern.”  This then becomes the focus of their visit with the…
  • Mayo Medical School Student Soyun Hwang Chosen for Fellowship with Howard Hughes Medical Institute

    Bob Nellis
    14 May 2015 | 12:42 pm
    A second-year student at Mayo Medical School -- Soyun (S. Michelle) Hwang -- has been selected by the Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI)   to receive a year-long fellowship to conduct mentored biomedical research.   Hwang will be mentoring at Mayo Clinic with Jennifer Westendorf, Ph.D., in orthopedic surgery. She will purse her interest in reconstructive surgery, which overlaps with surgical fields like orthopedics. She met Dr. Westendorf at the Perry Initiative, a national event aimed at diversifying the field of orthopedics. “This is a phenomenal opportunity,” Hwang says. “I…
  • Setting a Course for Sustainable Integrated Care with COMPASS

    Elizabeth Zimmermann Young
    12 May 2015 | 6:00 am
    Managing mental health in a primary care setting Mayo Clinic continually seeks ways to improve the way patients experience health care. One of the areas currently being investigated is mental health – specifically we are looking at ways to integrate behavioral health care into the primary care setting, providing opportunities for early intervention, enabling team-based care, and resulting in better health and potential cost savings. Under the leadership of the Institute for Clinical Systems Improvement (ICSI) and as part of a partnership of ten organizations nationally, David Katzelnick,…
  • Bridging Health Care Delivery and Community Health – An Opportunity to Reduce Health Disparities?

    Elizabeth Zimmermann Young
    8 May 2015 | 7:34 am
      Amenah Agunwamba, Sc.D., is a Health Sciences Research Fellow in the Mayo Clinic Robert D. and Patricia E. Kern Center for the Science of Health Care Delivery ________________________________________________________________________ Last month, I and 1,500 other researchers and clinicians from across more than 20 different disciplines, convened in San Antonio for the Society of Behavioral Medicine’s 36th Annual Meeting. Chaired by Dr. Lila Finney Rutten, who is also the scientific director for the Population Health Science Program in the Mayo Clinic Robert D. and Patricia E. Kern…
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    Mayo Clinic Center for Innovation

  • In Memory

    Center for Innovation
    25 May 2015 | 7:33 am
            In memory of those who have died in service.   _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________            
  • How Childhood Trauma Affects Health Across a Lifetime

    Center for Innovation
    22 May 2015 | 10:33 am
          Post written by Nadine Burke Harris, M.D.   Three months ago, a TED talk I gave was posted on the Internet, and the emails, calls, and letters began pouring in — from across the country and around the world. Women and men from Texas and Louisiana, Australia and the Czech Republic urged me to do whatever I can to protect and heal children who are going through the same kinds of traumatic, stressful events they went through as kids. They shared with me their stories about those experiences and the many health problems they experienced later as adults. They also…
  • 10 Articles You Need to Read Today

    Center for Innovation
    22 May 2015 | 5:52 am
        1. Caregiver support network highlights enormous need but can it work? ( MedCity News ) 2. Forget The Fitbit: Can Wearables Be Designed For The Developing World? ( CoEXIST ) 3. Changing the World – Step One. ( Innovation Excellence ) 4. 4 Tricks to Building a Successful Open Innovation Program. ( Innovation Management ) 5. Citizen Hackers Tinker With Medical Devices. ( The Wall Street Journal ) 6. Bringing healthcare to the heartland. ( mHealth News ) 7. Is Healthcare Designing the Wrong Patient Experience? ( CFI ) 8. A Deep Shared Experience: Giving a TED Talk About…
  • Destination: Imagination

    Center for Innovation
    20 May 2015 | 9:33 am
        Post written by Nitya Chandiramani   Depression. Suicide. Mental Illness. Each one of these dense words has various connotations associated with them, but one emerging theme of commonality that links them together can be summed up in one more word. Stigma. That is one of the messages a group of primarily high school seniors from Texas wanted to convey. This group of students called the Alternate Understudies was the winning team of Mayo Clinic’s Unlikely Superheroes Challenge. They performed a short skit at Mayo Clinic’s 2014 Transform conference. They acted out a…
  • Is Healthcare Designing the Wrong Patient Experience?

    Center for Innovation
    19 May 2015 | 1:30 pm
        Post written by Andy DeLao   Patient experience. It what's in. It's what's vogue. It's all the rage. There is a not a day that one cannot open a paper, a medical journal, Twitter, FaceBook, email, or a conference brochure and not see something about patient experience. In the U.S. its healthcare's new version of a best practice. It's another way to share best practices across an industry. It provides another bandwagon to hop on and spread across the great plains. But are we scaling mediocrity? In 1998 Joseph Pine II and James Gilmore wrote a paper published in the Harvard…
 
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    Mayo Clinic News Network » Radio

  • Mayo Clinic Radio: Osteoporosis/Teeth Whiteners/Food Allergies and Asthma

    Richard Dietman
    18 May 2015 | 4:42 am
    As we age, our bones may lose mass and become brittle. These are the signs and symptoms of osteoporosis. According to the National Osteoporosis Foundation, osteoporosis is responsible for 2 million broken bones each year in the U.S. Mayo Clinic endocrinologist Dr. Bart Clarke discusses osteoporosis and how to reduce its impact on your health. Also on the program, we explore the world of teeth whiteners ... what works and what doesn't ... with Mayo Clinic dentist Dr. Phillip Sheridan. And pediatric allergy expert Dr. Martha Hartz will join us to discuss food allergies and asthma in children.
  • Mayo Clinic Radio: Choosing Senior Care/Parasitic Wonders/Mouse Avatars

    Richard Dietman
    11 May 2015 | 4:31 am
    Choosing long-term care for a loved one ... or yourself ... can be a difficult decision. The level of care, the cost and the physical surroundings all must be considered. Mayo Clinic geriatric specialist Dr. Paul Takahashi offers guidance on how to evaluate long-term care facilities and services. Also on the program, parasitologist Dr. Bobbi Pritt talks about her unusual blog, "Creepy, Dreadful, Wonderful Parasites: A Parasitologist's View of the World." And Dr. John Weroha explains how mouse avatars are helping to fight cancer in humans. Miss the program?  Here's the…
  • Mayo Clinic Radio: Stroke Awareness/Proton Beam Therapy/Sunscreen Basics

    Richard Dietman
    4 May 2015 | 7:40 am
    A sudden numbness in your face, difficulty speaking, a severe headache. These are signs and symptoms of a stroke. Each year, nearly 800,000 people in the U.S. have a stroke. May is Stroke Awareness Month and on the next Mayo Clinic Radio, neurologist Dr. Robert Brown, Jr., talks about diagnosis and treatment of stroke. Also on the program, proton beam therapy uses highly focused radiation to treat tumors while reducing damage to surrounding tissue. Radiation oncologist Dr. Robert Foote explains how it works. And we'll have the basics on how to get the most out of sunscreen from…
  • Mayo Clinic Radio: Dense-Breast Imaging/Hospice Nursing/Medical History Book

    Richard Dietman
    27 Apr 2015 | 8:18 am
    It's well known that women with dense breast tissue are less likely to get accurate results from mammograms. Now there's a new breast-imaging technology called Molecular Breast Imaging, or MBI, that shows promise for increasing the rate of detection of invasive breast cancers in women with dense breasts. On the next Mayo Clinic Radio, Dr. Deborah Rhodes, Dr. Michael O'Connor and Dr. Katie Jones discuss MBI. Also on the program, nurses Margo Kroshus and Sherry Rengstorf share their advice and insights about hospice care. And cardiologist Dr. Bruce Fye talks about his new book, Caring for the…
  • Mayo Clinic Radio: Precision Medicine/Weight-Loss Surgery/Google

    Richard Dietman
    19 Apr 2015 | 6:41 pm
    Precision medicine ... also called individualized medicine ... got special attention recently when President Obama announced a Precision Medicine Initiative and called for the creation of a national biobank. On this week's program, Dr. Keith Stewart, director of the Mayo Clinic Center for Individualized Medicine, discusses the biobank and what it might mean for the future of health care. Also on the program, Mayo Clinic psychologist Dr. Karen Grothe explains the importance of a psychological evaluation when planning weight-loss surgery. And preventive medicine specialist Dr. Phil Hagen…
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    Diversity in Education Blog

  • Believe it or not…

    Andrew M. Harrsion
    13 May 2015 | 2:46 am
    By Dr. Jim Maher How can Mayo Clinic best honor the axis of diversity that might be called "faith," "belief," "unbelief," or "religion" and what leadership can be shown within Mayo Clinic's academic environment (the Mayo Clinic College of Medicine)? These were some of the questions that motivated a fascinating lunch session on May 11, 2015, organized by the College of Medicine Office for Diversity, and featuring a delightful panel representing a sampling of four faith traditions different from the nominal Christianity that typified 78% of Americans in 2010. The premise of the discussion…
  • Becoming a Question Artist

    Carl Gustafson
    19 Mar 2015 | 2:41 pm
    “In re mathematica ars proponendi quaestionem pluris facienda est quam solvendi.” – Georg Cantor Just when you thought Latin was a dead language… If I were to ask you a question, how would you answer it? …Did you just tell yourself, “well, Self, that depends on the type of question!”? Good. You’re awake! Let’s be more specific. Here is the question: What did Georg Cantor just say to the world? Since I assume that you already answered this question, how exactly did you go about answering it? There are possibly thousands or millions of strategies by which to conquer…
  • The Banality of “That’s Nice”

    Andrew M. Harrsion
    26 Feb 2015 | 7:43 pm
    By Nora E. King I sat in Mayo Clinic’s St. Marys Hospital cafeteria with my clinical team, in that awkward way medical students know too well: the attending physician (“consultant” at Mayo Clinic) buys you a cup of coffee and then proceeds to gossip with his buddies for the next 15 minutes. It’s never clear whether you should chuckle along with the stories or pretend to not listen, absorbed in your notes on the patient list. Unusually, the cafeteria was filled with music. “What’s that noise?” someone said. We glanced around and noticed a poster with sepia photos of famous Black…
  • Training in Research and Parenthood

    Clara Castillejobecerra
    29 Jan 2015 | 8:43 am
    Perhaps you are contemplating becoming a parent in the future. If so, you may be wondering how becoming a parent will affect your career, how you will handle your responsibilities as a researcher and parent, or how you will survive these tough years in graduate school with the addition of children. To answer some of these questions, this blog will offer different perspectives and advice from students who have made the decision to become both scientist and parents. c Fan-Chi Hsu, Ph.D. received her doctoral degree from the immunology track in November 2014. She and her husband, Chien-Chang…
  • Avoiding scientific nostalgia

    Carl Gustafson
    4 Jan 2015 | 8:41 pm
    Hello diversity blog readers and welcome to 2015! Thanks for sticking with us; we hope you’re as excited about the future of the blog as we are. If not, keep reading. Maybe someday we'll serve up the post you've been waiting for. Science moves pretty fast [citation needed]. In fact, it’s very difficult to quantify the rate of progress of science (umm, units?), and it seems that experts disagree on how to actually do this. Regardless, it appears that global scientific research output (units?) increases at a rate of 8-9% per year. Compare this to the rate of increase in global computer…
 
 
 
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