Mayo Clinic

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  • Patient Comes to Mayo for Foot Surgery, Receives Lifesaving Surprise

    Sharing Mayo Clinic
    Cynthia (Cindy) Weiss
    20 Jul 2015 | 10:00 am
    When Virgil Jernigan came to Mayo Clinic for foot surgery, he was in for a lifesaving surprise. During an exam before his surgery, he mentioned to his nurse practitioner that he had been feeling fatigued and short of breath. So she ordered cardiac testing. Virgil was shocked to learn he had a leaking mitral valve – a potentially life-threatening heart condition.  After consultations with his cardiology/cardiothoracic surgery team, Virgil was cleared for his orthopedic procedure. He also ultimately underwent a second, minimally invasive surgery to repair his mitral valve. Today, Virgil is…
  • AcademyHealth 2015 – A Strong Showing for Mayo, Advancement of the Evidence Base for Health Care Delivery

    Advancing the Science
    Jon Ebbert, M.D.
    23 Jul 2015 | 6:00 am
    The AcademyHealth 2015 Annual Research Meeting (ARM) provided a high-profile forum for the Mayo Clinic Robert D. and Patricia E. Kern Center for the Science of Health Care Delivery (CSHCD) to showcase the diverse, high quality research conducted by center affiliated research teams. Mayo Clinic was well-represented, with 27 poster abstract authors, five oral presentations, and five participants in discussion panels throughout the symposium.  Because ARM’s focus is health services research, which aligns closely with the science of health care delivery, the majority of these presenters were…
  • Mapping Your Healthcare Journey

    Mayo Clinic Center for Innovation
    Center for Innovation
    27 Jul 2015 | 9:48 am
          Post written by Pivot Design Group   The seed of each idea comes from a conversation that starts with “What if…” and ends with “Wouldn’t it be great if…” We can prototype for organizational teams, project managers, start-ups and more. Prototyping helps bring focus to the key user interactions of a product or service. Without coming to a final design solution, it’s a way to get an idea off the ground and get feedback — all you need is the seed of an idea and we can help with the rest. Unhampered by technological barriers and business constraints…
  • Mayo Clinic Radio: Doctor Shortage/Medical School/House Calls/Binge Eating

    Mayo Clinic News Network » Radio
    Richard Dietman
    27 Jul 2015 | 4:29 am
    Primary care doctors are often on the front lines of providing medical care. But they are increasingly in short supply as more aging Americans need health care. On the next Mayo Clinic Radio, family medicine specialist Dr. John Bachman discusses the growing doctor shortage and how to reverse it. Also on the program, Mayo Medical School Interim Dean Dr. Michele Halyard and Senior Associate Dean for Academic Affairs Dr. Darcy Reed outline what's new in training tomorrow's doctors. And Dr. Paul Takahashi, a specialist in geriatric medicine, talks about how house calls are again being…
  • Grey Lines – Stepping Over the Interdisciplinary Boundary in Healthcare Education

    Diversity in Education Blog
    Andrew M. Harrsion
    16 Jul 2015 | 3:15 pm
    By Thomas Mork I was sitting in Phillips Hall in the Siebens Building at Mayo Clinic, immersed in a speech by “Bob”: former patient, cancer survivor, and nationally-renowned speaker. He stood proudly at the podium while his voice reverberated among a crowd of physicians, nurses, and physical therapy students. This self-described “active patient” defied cancer by becoming a dynamic advocate for himself during his medical care. As his story goes, he brought forward multiple treatment options that his physician never considered. They decided to try these treatments when standard care was…
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    Sharing Mayo Clinic

  • Patient Comes to Mayo for Foot Surgery, Receives Lifesaving Surprise

    Cynthia (Cindy) Weiss
    20 Jul 2015 | 10:00 am
    When Virgil Jernigan came to Mayo Clinic for foot surgery, he was in for a lifesaving surprise. During an exam before his surgery, he mentioned to his nurse practitioner that he had been feeling fatigued and short of breath. So she ordered cardiac testing. Virgil was shocked to learn he had a leaking mitral valve – a potentially life-threatening heart condition.  After consultations with his cardiology/cardiothoracic surgery team, Virgil was cleared for his orthopedic procedure. He also ultimately underwent a second, minimally invasive surgery to repair his mitral valve. Today, Virgil is…
  • Walking by Faith, and Now by Sight

    Hoyt Finnamore
    8 Jul 2015 | 6:49 am
    In many ways, Jenny Peterson was like other mothers of young children. She cooked and baked, cleaned and washed clothes, and cheered her children on from the sidelines of their activities. In one significant way, though, Jenny was different: She did all of these things without sight. Jenny lost her vision in 1976, after having a severe reaction to antibiotics. "I developed toxic epidermal necrolysis, and lost 100 percent of my skin, my hair and fingernails," says Jenny, a resident of Vermillion, South Dakota. She was just 23 at the time. Her children, just 2 and 5. The antibiotics were meant…
  • Cardiac Rehabilitation Helps Ardis Kyker Improve Her Health, Lose Weight and Avoid Surgery

    Hoyt Finnamore
    2 Jul 2015 | 1:25 pm
    Back in 2014, Ardis Kyker was at home going about her daily routine when she experienced tightening in her chest. The pain went away as soon as she sat down to rest, so she proceeded with her day. Later, while pushing a cart at a grocery store, the pain returned with more intensity. So Ardis checked in at the Emergency Department at Mayo Clinic Health System in Red Wing, Minnesota. While test results ruled out a heart attack, the team in the Emergency Department scheduled her for a stress test because of the pain she was feeling on exertion. The stress test explained the chest pain. Ardis…
  • From Patient to Physician

    Hoyt Finnamore
    26 Jun 2015 | 6:05 am
    Dr. Brandon Lane Phillips' experience as a patient and a student at Mayo Clinic influences his own practice of medicine today As a pediatric cardiology fellow at Mayo Clinic, Dr. Brandon Lane Phillips cared for a number of children from Mongolia who had congenital heart defects. Before they went into surgery, he would take a photo of their hands next to his on a white piece of paper. He would do the same again after surgery and before they returned home. The difference was striking. "In the pictures before heart surgery, you could clearly see a blue cast to their skin. After surgery, the blue…
  • West Nile Put Gloria Johnson on a Ventilator. Rehab Brings Her Back

    Hoyt Finnamore
    24 Jun 2015 | 12:00 pm
    Gloria Johnson’s life changed in the blink of an eye. Gloria and her husband, Floyd, were camping in South Dakota in August 2013, when her body’s temperature skyrocketed to 104.6 degrees, and her body went limp. She went from enjoying her time at a campground to being paralyzed from the neck down. She was diagnosed with West Nile virus, which is transmitted by mosquitoes. Most people infected with West Nile virus experience a slight fever or a mild headache. Gloria was in the minority – less than one percent – of people affected neurologically by the virus. She ended up being admitted…
 
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    Advancing the Science

  • AcademyHealth 2015 – A Strong Showing for Mayo, Advancement of the Evidence Base for Health Care Delivery

    Jon Ebbert, M.D.
    23 Jul 2015 | 6:00 am
    The AcademyHealth 2015 Annual Research Meeting (ARM) provided a high-profile forum for the Mayo Clinic Robert D. and Patricia E. Kern Center for the Science of Health Care Delivery (CSHCD) to showcase the diverse, high quality research conducted by center affiliated research teams. Mayo Clinic was well-represented, with 27 poster abstract authors, five oral presentations, and five participants in discussion panels throughout the symposium.  Because ARM’s focus is health services research, which aligns closely with the science of health care delivery, the majority of these presenters were…
  • Data Accuracy and Integrity – Without Which We Have Nothing

    Jon Ebbert, M.D.
    21 Jul 2015 | 6:00 am
    “The cornerstone of our ability to make robust inference and sound clinical decisions is the assumption of the validity, accuracy and representativeness of medical research data.” So says Véronique Roger, M.D., Director, Mayo Clinic Robert D. and Patricia E. Kern Center for the Science of Health Care Delivery, and in her July editorial in the American Heart Association’s journal, Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes. Dr. Roger likens the core principles of accuracy and integrity to the underpinnings of our society…as universally understood as “motherhood and apple…
  • Mayo Uses Regenerative Medicine to Contribute to Mitochondrial Disease Repair

    Bob Nellis
    15 Jul 2015 | 11:59 am
    Mitochondrial disease has been one of the toughest conditions in medicine. It primarily impacts children inheriting the condition, leaving few if any treatment options. Today, a collaborative group of researchers -- including those from Mayo Clinic's Center for Regenerative Medicine, report they have found a way to eliminate the fatal mutations the inherited DNA leaves in cells. The findings appear in the journal Nature. Dr. Andre Terzic This is a proof-of-concept study, but it paves the way toward the long search for a therapy. The announcement from the Oregon University of Health &…
  • Overuse or Inappropriate Use – More Tests Are Not Necessarily Better

    Elizabeth Zimmermann Young
    14 Jul 2015 | 5:00 am
    H. Pylori Case Study - An opportunity to do the right test on the right patient at the right time? Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori is a common bacterial infection that as many as 50 percent of all people in the world have been exposed to. Fortunately, not everyone who has the infection will experience symptoms, but some may suffer a wide range of effects, and are at risk to develop peptic ulcers, gastritis or some stomach cancers. Both the American Gastroenterology Association (since 2005) and American College of Gastroenterology (since 2007) recommend use of either the H. pylori stool antigen…
  • Mayo Psychiatrists Honored For Depression, Bipolar Research

    Bob Nellis
    23 Jun 2015 | 8:27 am
    Two Mayo Clinic psychiatrists have been recognized for their contributions to the study, diagnosis, and treatment of depression and bipolar disorder. Paul Croarkin, D.O., and Mark Frye, M.D., were both presented with the Depression and Bipolar Support Alliance’s (DBSA) highest honors for members of the scientific community: Gerald L. Klerman Awards. The Klerman awards are named for the late Gerald L. Klerman, a psychiatrist and expert on depression. Dr. Paul Croarkin Dr. Paul Croarkin is the Gerald L. Klerman Young Investigator Award recipient. Dr. Croarkin received his medical degree at…
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    Mayo Clinic Center for Innovation

  • Mapping Your Healthcare Journey

    Center for Innovation
    27 Jul 2015 | 9:48 am
          Post written by Pivot Design Group   The seed of each idea comes from a conversation that starts with “What if…” and ends with “Wouldn’t it be great if…” We can prototype for organizational teams, project managers, start-ups and more. Prototyping helps bring focus to the key user interactions of a product or service. Without coming to a final design solution, it’s a way to get an idea off the ground and get feedback — all you need is the seed of an idea and we can help with the rest. Unhampered by technological barriers and business constraints…
  • Never Stop Learning and Growing

    Center for Innovation
    27 Jul 2015 | 7:00 am
           
  • 5 Awesome Stories to Read Today

    Center for Innovation
    27 Jul 2015 | 4:00 am
          1. Using Medical Algorithms as Clinical Prediction Tools. [ Medal ] 2. Designing for Behavior as the Critical Path for Patient Engagement. [ Prescribe Design ] 3. Predicting Patient Experience with Narrative Data. [ saama ] 4. Why Innovation in Health Care is So Hard. [ HBR ] 5. Consumer Driven Innovation. [ Inside the Box ]    
  • Thinking Beyond the Clinical Encounter

    Center for Innovation
    24 Jul 2015 | 1:32 pm
            Post originally found on Victor Montori's Shared Decision Blog   Work in shared decision making tends to focus on the clinical encounter.  Some research has focused on how to prepare patients and clinicians for a decision making encounter.  Other work has focused on how to facilitate conversations during an encounter or measuring the extent of shared decision making that occurs between patient and provider.  This focus on the clinical encounter likely has multiple origins. First, much of the research in shared decision making has focused on decisions…
  • Pernicious Moralizing

    Center for Innovation
    24 Jul 2015 | 9:33 am
          Post written by Pritpal S Tamber   One question has surfaced a few times over the last few weeks, and I wanted to reflect on it here: “How is what you are doing different to public health?”   Public health, according to Wikipedia, is: the science and art of preventing disease, prolonging life and promoting health through the organised efforts and informed choices of society, organisations, public and private, communities and individuals   It sounds awesome but my experience of it – as a citizen and an observer of health and health care – is…
 
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    Mayo Clinic News Network » Radio

  • Mayo Clinic Radio: Doctor Shortage/Medical School/House Calls/Binge Eating

    Richard Dietman
    27 Jul 2015 | 4:29 am
    Primary care doctors are often on the front lines of providing medical care. But they are increasingly in short supply as more aging Americans need health care. On the next Mayo Clinic Radio, family medicine specialist Dr. John Bachman discusses the growing doctor shortage and how to reverse it. Also on the program, Mayo Medical School Interim Dean Dr. Michele Halyard and Senior Associate Dean for Academic Affairs Dr. Darcy Reed outline what's new in training tomorrow's doctors. And Dr. Paul Takahashi, a specialist in geriatric medicine, talks about how house calls are again being…
  • Mayo Clinic Radio: Antibiotic Resistance/Opioid Addiction/Routine Physical Exams

    Richard Dietman
    20 Jul 2015 | 8:58 am
    According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 23,000 people die each year in the U.S. as the result of antibiotic-resistant infections. Antibiotics are powerful weapons in the fight against infection, but misuse or overuse can create a serious health risk. On the next Mayo Clinic Radio, infectious diseases specialist Dr. Pritish Tosh explains how antibiotic resistance works and how to avoid it. Also on the program, a new study in Mayo Clinic Proceedings may help predict who is most vulnerable to opioid pain medication addiction. Anesthesiologist and pain management specialist…
  • Mayo Clinic Radio: Breast Surgery/Nail Fungus/Mammogram Guidelines/Hair Loss

    Richard Dietman
    13 Jul 2015 | 4:28 am
    For most women, breast surgery means mastectomy. But there are other types of breast surgery, including breast reconstruction and breast augmentation. On the next Mayo Clinic Radio, surgeon Dr. Steven Jacobson discusses the different kinds of breast surgery. Also on the program, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force has released draft guidelines for breast cancer screening. Dr. Sandhya Pruthi, who evaluates and treats women in the Mayo Clinic Breast Diagnostic Clinic, offers her assessment of the new guidelines. And dermatologist Dr. Dawn Davis has tips for managing nail fungal…
  • Mayo Clinic Radio: Kidney Stones/Benefits of Chocolate/High-Tech Anesthesia

    Richard Dietman
    7 Jul 2015 | 5:40 am
    They're often no larger than a grain of sand ... but they can be extremely painful. Kidney stones are small, hard mineral deposits that form in your kidneys, and they're more common during the summer months. On this week's program, urologist Dr. Amy Krambeck explains what causes kidney stones and how they're treated. Also on the show, cardiologist Dr. Stephen Kopecky discusses a new study that shows cardiovascular benefits from eating both dark and milk chocolate. And anesthesiologist Dr. Denise Wedel reviews the latest advances in high-tech anesthesia. Myth or Matter-of-Fact: There is a…
  • Mayo Clinic Radio: IBD and IBS/Treadmill Test/Weight-Loss Maintenance

    Richard Dietman
    29 Jun 2015 | 3:00 am
    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) are two very different chronic digestive system conditions that are sometimes confused with one another. On this week's program, gastroenterologists Dr. Sunanda Kane and Dr. Yuri Saito discuss the differences between IBD and IBS, and explain how each is treated. Also on the program, Dr. Thomas Allison, director  of the Mayo Clinic Sports Cardiology Program, talks about a simple treadmill test that can help predict whether you'll live 10 years or more. And psychologist Dr. Karen Grothe has strategies for keeping the…
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    Diversity in Education Blog

  • Grey Lines – Stepping Over the Interdisciplinary Boundary in Healthcare Education

    Andrew M. Harrsion
    16 Jul 2015 | 3:15 pm
    By Thomas Mork I was sitting in Phillips Hall in the Siebens Building at Mayo Clinic, immersed in a speech by “Bob”: former patient, cancer survivor, and nationally-renowned speaker. He stood proudly at the podium while his voice reverberated among a crowd of physicians, nurses, and physical therapy students. This self-described “active patient” defied cancer by becoming a dynamic advocate for himself during his medical care. As his story goes, he brought forward multiple treatment options that his physician never considered. They decided to try these treatments when standard care was…
  • Read this while standing

    Carl Gustafson
    5 Jul 2015 | 5:08 pm
    “What you are doing, right now, is killing you!” Nilofer Merchant scanned a suddenly breathless crowd with a faux menace at her 2013 TED talk. The audience breathlessly awaited her answer: what could possibly be killing us so menacingly and discretely that we would simply sit here and allow it? Well, I agree with her, so let me repeat it. What you are doing, right now, is killing you. And me. We are sitting. And that is what is killing us. I often sit for 8-10 hours every day: reading papers, documenting results, in meetings, culturing cells, you name it – I am sitting down. Then I go…
  • Believe it or not…

    Andrew M. Harrsion
    13 May 2015 | 2:46 am
    By Dr. Jim Maher How can Mayo Clinic best honor the axis of diversity that might be called "faith," "belief," "unbelief," or "religion" and what leadership can be shown within Mayo Clinic's academic environment (the Mayo Clinic College of Medicine)? These were some of the questions that motivated a fascinating lunch session on May 11, 2015, organized by the College of Medicine Office for Diversity, and featuring a delightful panel representing a sampling of four faith traditions different from the nominal Christianity that typified 78% of Americans in 2010. The premise of the discussion…
  • Becoming a Question Artist

    Carl Gustafson
    19 Mar 2015 | 2:41 pm
    “In re mathematica ars proponendi quaestionem pluris facienda est quam solvendi.” – Georg Cantor Just when you thought Latin was a dead language… If I were to ask you a question, how would you answer it? …Did you just tell yourself, “well, Self, that depends on the type of question!”? Good. You’re awake! Let’s be more specific. Here is the question: What did Georg Cantor just say to the world? Since I assume that you already answered this question, how exactly did you go about answering it? There are possibly thousands or millions of strategies by which to conquer…
  • The Banality of “That’s Nice”

    Andrew M. Harrsion
    26 Feb 2015 | 7:43 pm
    By Nora E. King I sat in Mayo Clinic’s St. Marys Hospital cafeteria with my clinical team, in that awkward way medical students know too well: the attending physician (“consultant” at Mayo Clinic) buys you a cup of coffee and then proceeds to gossip with his buddies for the next 15 minutes. It’s never clear whether you should chuckle along with the stories or pretend to not listen, absorbed in your notes on the patient list. Unusually, the cafeteria was filled with music. “What’s that noise?” someone said. We glanced around and noticed a poster with sepia photos of famous Black…
 
 
 
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